17Nov/160

5G will be here by 2020: What will that really mean in Japan, South Korea and the United States?

pujol_frederic

Frédéric Pujol, Head of the mobile services, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Europe’s future society and economy will rely heavily on 5G infrastructure. The impact will go far beyond existing wireless access networks, with the of having faster communication services that are available everywhere, all the time.

 

5G is a real opportunity for the European ICT sector, which is already well positioned in the global R&D race. 5G technologies will be adopted and deployed globally in line with the needs of developed and emerging markets.

While many of the technical aspects attached to 5G are scaling up globally, requirements analysis for key vertical sectors is progressing rapidly. The emergence and deployment of 5G technology is likely to trigger innovation in the industry, thus leveraging sustainable societal change.

There is a vision for 5G to become a stakeholder-driven, holistic ecosystem for technical and business innovation, integrating networking, computing and storage resources into one programmable and unified infrastructure. In addition, thanks to real-time and larger traffic volume capabilities, 5G is expected to enable the transport of software to the data rather than the other way round, i.e. executing software on the device where the data are produced instead of sending all data to a centralised datacentre – thereby paving the way for new opportunities in the cloud computing market, where European companies could gain a significant market share.

In the long run, it will not be enough to explore the requirements of vertical industries, and a proper analysis will also need to be conducted of market trends to sense new, upcoming technology, especially from companies outside the industrial mainstream. Potentially disruptive technologies typically go widely undetected by the established industry, but clearly have a real potential to become engines of significant technical change and innovation. Unanticipated 5G features are likely to emerge from future technological, legal, societal and socio-economic considerations

mobile_networks_forum5g_fp

 

DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

World LTE market & MBB spectrum: Markets at June 2015 & Forecasts to 2019 Players - Technologies - CapEx – Pricing – Dec. 2015
Key outcomes from WRC-15: Four years to pave the way for the future of telecoms, Feb. 2016

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15Nov/160

Blockchain & Financial market transformation: The challenges and opportunities of FinTech for the financial industry

copigneaux_bertrand

Bertrand Copigneaux
Senior Consultant, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Banking has long represented a big market for IT and digital technologies. It is probably one of the sectors that has invested the most in information technologies over time, for retail banking activities, and more recently for risk control systems to ensure compliance with banking and finance regulations.

More recently, however, digital innovation in this sector has been overtaken by the explosion of FinTech. Hundreds of start-ups have demonstrated the potential to innovate and transform the banking and finance as we know it. In light of recent events, several areas of innovation have emerged from the development of FinTech, either in competition or partnership with veteran banking industry players.

Every corner of the financial sector is affected, from payment solutions, to credit and lending activities faced with crowdsourced alternatives, the use of blockchains and cryptocurrency-based solutions, to the emergence of high frequency trading, big data analysis solutions and AI roboadvisors.

These technologies are disrupting the finance ecosystem, and paving the way for new players, and new business models. They also open up opportunities for the industry to transform itself and become more efficient and profitable.

decentralised_application_business_models_using_blockchain_fintech_bc

 

DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

Blockchain, Oct. 2016
Mobile Payment: The state of the industry, amid new stakes, Apr. 2016

 

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15Nov/160

Ultra-Fast Broadband Public Policies Does any one country provide a model of reference?

attali_moreno

Pierre-Michel Attali & Nicolas Moreno, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Europe 2020, the key document in Europe’s growth strategy for the coming years, published by the EuropeanCommission in May 2010, unveiled the objectives of the Digital Agenda for Europe (DAE).

 

One of the main questions concerns the efficiency of the different national plans (technological approach, funding, regulation…) which have been designed to achieve the objectives of the DAE.

National programme objectives in sync with the Digital Agenda for Europe

With the exception of France, whose coverage objectives are two years behind Europe’s, and Sweden which does not have specific time-related targets, many national plans are in line with DAE coverage objectives. Most European countries have also set additional targets, in most cases to achieve more ambitious UFB objectives, either in terms of connection speeds (France, Italy) or time frame (Germany, Sweden).

Currently disparate landscape

The disparate coverage levels in European countries cannot be attributed to any single factor, but rather to a combination of demographics, technological choices and the strength of private investment. Each European country has established a public policy (objectives, technologies) based on its own situation and features. These national plans are vital but in themselves not enough to achieve complete superfast coverage, or nationwide ultrafast 100 Mbps coverage down the road.

european_superfast_ultrafast_rankings_pma_nm_futurenetworksforum

 

DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

World FTTx market: Markets at December 2015 & Forecasts to 2020,July 2016
Digital Agenda Europe, Europe (EU-28) at the end of 2015, July 2016
Public policies for UFB, Benchmarking 7 countries in relation to the Digital Agenda for Europe, June 2016
Telco investment challenges, CapEX dynamics, Dec. 2015

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13Nov/160

Keynote: Trust in the Digital Age

fernandez_ramon_orange_300x300v3

Interview with: Ramon Fernandez,
Deputy CEO, Group Chief Financial and Strategy Officer, Orange

''Trust is a key asset in an ever more complex and digital world.''

Why are trust issues at the heart of conversations today?

Perhaps because it has become so rare! We are in a crisis of confidence, which is global and extends across the whole society, beyond the economy. Today, in Europe and in our industry, many people do not trust our ecosystem players with their personal data that they nevertheless share everyday. More and more services are fully dematerialized. A number of very large digital actors are not present in the physical world, have not set up physical shops and a growing share of customer relationships is performed by robots ... If  data is the fuel of our digital world, trust is essential to succeed in the long term.

Is the « trusted third parties » notion – which is often extended to telecom operators, still meaningful? 

More than ever in our digital world, we are operating in an increasingly open, fragmented and dynamic environment; it is more and more important to have reference points. With the rise of new digital players, trust is built through new and evolving markers, it becomes distributed: for example a sum of other users’ insights about an apartment on Airbnb or about a car on Drivy, or the blockchain algorithm... More than a "trusted third party" strictly speaking, customers are looking for a truly trusted partner. Orange wants to play that role.

What role does the Orange Mobile Banking project play in this positionning as « trusted partner »?

It is based on the "trust capital" we have built and earned over time with millions of customers around the world, that Orange can today be legitimate to manage its customers’ money. It is also its credibility in terms of innovation, which means that Orange is expected to offer a new and fully mobile banking experience. Finally, it is an opportunity to leverage our experience in Africa where we have 20 million Orange Money customers. So there is a real logic for Orange to launch its own financial services and we are doing it in partnership with Groupama.

 

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6Nov/162

Trust is key to the success of smart cities

baudouin_philippe

Philippe Baudouin,
Head of Smart City Practice, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

The prospects opened up by the smart city are rooted in a more intense use of digital technologies in the multiple components that make up the urban ecosystem: transport, security, network management, environmental management, waste management, transforming commerce, tourism, relations with government services, etc.

It is well understood that smart city projects can only develop successfully if the applications are relevant (useful and accepted) and if they are gradually interwoven with a cross-cutting momentum on a city-wide scale.

Beyond that, the success of these initiatives will depend in large part on users’ trust in the digital infrastructure and services on offer, along with the project’s ability to mobilise all of the urban ecosystem’s stakeholders. Taking proper account of these prerequisites must be central to governing any smart city project.
How to persuade users of the benefits of smart city projects?

  • How to exploit the full potential of participatory democracy (civil tech) when running a smart city project?
  • How can open data help strengthen trust in smart cities?
  • How to prevent a smart city project from becoming just a juxtaposition of separate initiatives, bereft of synergies?
  • How to talk about the risks of cybersecurity in a smart city project?
  • What process needs to be in place to ensure the development of a resilient smart city?

smart_city_forum_trust

DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

Smart Cities & IoT – Nov. 2016
Connected Cities - Dec. 2016

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3Nov/160

Meet the start-ups nominated for the 2016 DigiWorld Awards

logo_dwa2016

Rewarding FrenchTech talents around the world.

 

 

The 38th annual DigiWorld Summit, in partnership with Business France and French Tech, IDATE will be hosting the second annual DigiWorld Awards, recognising excellence in digital start-ups created by French entrepreneurs outside of France.

And the nominees for 2016 are…

The Jury made an initial selection of 12 start-ups from among the applications received. Four winners will be chosen for the three main geographical regions: Africa – the Middle East, the Americas and Asia – Pacific

The nominated start-ups all satisfied the following criteria:

 • A company created outside of France by at least one French national;

 • Have a digital tech industry business as its main activity: equipment and devices, networks and telecoms, Internet services and applications (BtoC, BtoB…), M2M, IoT…

 • Demonstrate their growth potential in their chosen field and internationally.

DigiWorld Awards Nominees
APrivacy Gatecoin Locolo Smart Alpha
Boosst Group HelperChoice Pzartech Virtuafit
Chalkboard Education JITbase Rilos YOO Sourcing

A Special Jury Prize will be awarded to an overseas start-up born of the Région Occitanie development ecosystem.

Special Jury Prize Nominees
CopSonic Emersya Intuilab

Tales of French entrepreneurial spirit from the four corners of the globe.

“Launched in 2015, these awards aim to set themselves apart from the many others that recognise our start-ups at various stages of their development,” explains IDATE DigiWorld’s Deputy CEO, Jean-Dominique Séval. “By focusing on these French entrepreneurs who chose to create their start-up in another country, we want not only to train the spotlight on them but also to send the message that these talents represent a tremendous resource for our country’s digital future.”

More than anything, it is a perfect illustration of “French Tech” talent: a government initiative that was picked up and developed by industry stakeholders, including founding member Business France. Since 2015, French Tech Hubs have been created in more than 15 major cities around the globe, which represent key growth centres for French Tech start-ups. The goal is to work in concert to bring the various public actors (Business France, consulates, chambers of commerce, local authorities…) together under a single umbrella with a network of entrepreneurs that have a solid footing in overseas markets (start-ups, conglomerates, investors, engineers, designers and developers), which can serve as mentors for young start-ups wanting to develop their business in that market, and as ambassadors for French Tech with local decision-makers.

The DigiWorld Awards thus provide a unique opportunity to recognise the many entrepreneurs who have created a start-up abroad, and to reward those who have been successful overseas… perhaps before coming to France!

Prizes and rewards

The winners in each category will receive their trophy during a special ceremony that will be held at 7 pm on 16 November 2016, at the Corum in Montpellier, with special guest and Jury Chair, Pierre Chappaz, President of Teads.

Each of the prizes will be awarded by the event’s sponsors – Accenture, Capgemini, Ericsson and Orange – which will each provide the winning start-ups with access to their international Innovation resources. And of course Région Occitanie, sponsor of the Special Jury Prize.

 • With the support of our partner, Air France, the winning start-ups will be invited to the DigiWorld Summit to attend the awards ceremony held during a plenary session of the conference.

 • The winners will be added to Wproject (www.wproject.fr), the key listing and promotional platform for French entrepreneurs working abroad.

 

> For complete details: http://www.digiworldsummit.com/awards/

> Download the press release

  A competition hosted by IDATE DigiWorld

logos_awards

28Sep/160

DigiWorld Summit: The Digital Trust Economy

Logo-DWS2016_WEB400x150

Debate over the crucial role that trust will play in the digital economy’s future

 

The 38th annual DigiWorld Summit will run from 15 – 17 November 2016, and have as its central theme: The Internet of Trust. It will be an opportunity to engage in a meaningful international debate over digital trust issues – starting with security and privacy – which have become major sources of concern for all of the ecosystem’s stakeholders.

As the number of reported cyber-attacks worldwide is growing by close to 40% a year, we expect that upcoming stages in digital technologies’ evolution will only amplify the phenomenon. And this to such an extent that any future scenario is possible: from a continuation of the current chaos to a breakdown in trust that would lead to the construction of a new digital economy, which will no doubt differ in many respects from the one we know today.=

Are we reaching a tolerance threshold for online trust?
How can veteran digital industry players (equipment suppliers, telcos, IT companies) capitalise on the current climate?
Are verticals threatened by the situation or, on the contrary, on the winning side of trust and security issues?
Do we need a new regulatory framework to govern, or reassure, market players and consumers?

> Including the 120 speakers on this edition:
•    Eva BERNEKE, CEO, KMD
•    Anne BOUVEROT, CEO, Morpho
•    Isabelle FALQUE-PIERROTIN, Chairwoman, CNIL
•    Pierre, CHAPPAZ, Co-founder & Executive Chairman, Teads
•    Didier LAMOUCHE, President & CEO, Oberthur
•    Joseph LUBIN, Founder & CEO, ConsenSys, Co-Founder Ethereum
•    Carlos LOPEZ BLANCO, Global Head, Public and Regulatory Affairs, Telefónica
•    Stéphane RICHARD, Chairman & CEO, Orange
•    Corrado SCIOLLA, President Europe, BT Global Services
•    Nicolas SEKKAKI, CEO France, IBM

Choosing the theme for the 2016 DigiWorld Summit came about quite naturally. The vast majority of IDATE DigiWorld were eager to tackle the topic of trust.
For some time now, trust has been recognised as a vital ingredient in the success of a brand, an economy or a society. This is all the more true in a world being transformed by digital innovation. In its scenarios for 2025, IDATE DigiWorld underscored that trust was one of the key variables in tomorrow’s digital ecosystem. To shore up this belief, we need only look at some recent headlines:

•    the cyberattacks against telcos, TV networks and government agencies,
•    the legal wrangles between Apple and WhatsApp and government authorities wanting access to the encryption key for the devices or messages;
    the very drawn out European Union negotiations over new data protection rules;
•     the end of the Safe Harbor transatlantic agreement and ensuing debates over the new Privacy Shield;
    questions over the dangers surrounding connected/driverless cars, and the growing ubiquity of the IoT in general;
    the ad–blocking phenomenon;
    questions over what impact multiple FinTech solutions will have on the soundness of the banking system, and blockchain’s ability to replace today’s trusted third parties;
So trust is a focal point for telcos, cloud computing companies, Internet giants, start–ups, governments and regulators, but also for every economic sector across the board, not to mention consumers and citizens.
And, as always, acknowledging risk must not prevent us from also analysing opportunities, in terms of innovation, differentiation strategies and the competitive advantages available to many market players.

Once again this year, the vital meeting place that this international conference has become, will include plenary sessions that will provide a springboard for a series of high–level specialty forums.  These forums are an opportunity to delve deeper into the main trends we expect to see in mobile networks with the advent of 5G, ultrafast broadband, the Internet of Things, the TV market’s transformation in Europe, FinTech, video games, the digital promise in Africa and what makes a smart city.

A unique international forum for debate and networking

> DigiWorld Week
A week devoted to understanding what makes our new digital world tick (12 – 20 November 2016)
> The DigiWorld Awards
Recognising the best digital start-ups created by French entrepreneurs abroad

Key facts & figures

Europe’s trailblazing conference on the digital economy

The DigiWorld Summit is an annual event organised and hosted by IDATE experts, with the support of DigiWorld Institute members. Every year it holds ultra high-level international debates on the core issues shaping the digital economy, with the finest speakers and industry insiders.

Participants: 1,200 participants at the DigiWorld Summit and more than 5,000 at DigiWorld Week
Speakers: 120 speakers from around the world; 400 at DigiWorld Week
Partners and sponsors: over 100 partners and sponsors (businesses, public sector, media…)
Social media: 15,000 tweets (trending topics) and 2,000 live followers

For more information, visit our website: www.digiworldsummit.com

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26Feb/160

DigiWorld Summit 2016: The Internet of Trust

Logo-DWS2016_WEB400x150

Debate over the crucial role that trust will play in the digital economy’s future

 

The 38th annual DigiWorld Summit will run from 15 – 17 November 2016, and have as its central theme: The Internet of Trust. It will be an opportunity to engage in a meaningful international debate over digital trust issues – starting with security and privacy – which have become major sources of concern for all of the ecosystem’s stakeholders.

As the number of reported cyber-attacks worldwide is growing by close to 40% a year, we expect that upcoming stages in digital technologies’ evolution will only amplify the phenomenon. And this to such an extent that any future scenario is possible: from a continuation of the current chaos to a breakdown in trust that would lead to the construction of a new digital economy, which will no doubt differ in many respects from the one we know today.=

Are we reaching a tolerance threshold for online trust?
How can veteran digital industry players (equipment suppliers, telcos, IT companies) capitalise on the current climate?
Are verticals threatened by the situation or, on the contrary, on the winning side of trust and security issues?
Do we need a new regulatory framework to govern, or reassure, market players and consumers?

The need for a profound reassessment of security and trust issues seems inevitable: massive increases in spending on security solutions, rise in protectionist behaviour (use of ad-blockers, battle against botnets, etc.), avoidance tactics (piracy and circumvention), clarification of the terms governing access to private data and the management of digital identities and online reputation… There is no shortage of issues and threats affecting the rate of adoption of digital technologies, but which could also prove to be opportunities for all market players.

> Use and misuse of trust
Will trust be a key parameter in tomorrow’s Internet?
The privacy paradox: Usage is high, trust is low: Are we reaching a tolerance threshold for online trust?
Digital trust at the heart of customer relations? How do Internet companies and verticals gain their customers’ trust?
Can we trust digital world players? Can the Internet giants continue to be both the arbiters and targets of their users’ trust issues?
Can the digital world trust us? Focus on piracy: Can businesses trust their customers?

> Trust technologies
   A broad field of innovation for market leaders and start-ups
Innovative security solutions: biometrics, etc.: What can we expect from the next wave of innovations in the arena of cyber security and data control?
Blockchains and decentralized trust: Will today’s trusted third parties be cut out of the loop?

> Trust altering the digital value chain
Will trust be a game-changer?
Trusted third parties & digital coaches: Will we see new trusted third parties emerge (banking, post, health…)
Do we need more secure enablers? New growth enablers for telecom and IT industry leaders?
What role for telcos? Monetise data or become trusted third parties?

> Business model crash test
Will the current and future business models for trust-sensitive advertising and IoT markets be suited to the new climate?
Real time biding and programmatic ad buying: Can online advertising survive and adapt to the loss of trust?
Big Data and the Internet of Things: Will successful trust management be key to the future of IoT and monetisation initiatives?

> Regulation of trust, and trust in regulation
    How can regulation stimulate usage and innovation while also safeguarding against threats and transgressions in the digital economy?
Trust and anti-trust: what about platforms? Can and must online platforms be regulated?
Safe Harbor and Privacy Shield – the new deal: Can a balance be struck between conflicting European and US positions?
Cybersecurity and terrorism: Are the future credibility of and trust in the digital economy bound up with the fight against global threats?

A unique international forum for debate and networking

> Thematic Forums

  • Connected Things Forum
  • Fibre Networks Forum
  • TV & Video Forum
  • FinTech Forum
  • Mobile Networks Forum
  • Digital Africa Forum
  • Game Summit

> DigiWorld Week
   A full week of symposiums and partner events (13 – 21 November 2016)

> The DigiWorld Awards
    Recognising the best digital start-ups created by French entrepreneurs abroad

Key facts & figures

Europe’s trailblazing conference on the digital economy

The DigiWorld Summit is an annual event organised and hosted by IDATE experts, with the support of DigiWorld Institute members. Every year it holds ultra high-level international debates on the core issues shaping the digital economy, with the finest speakers and industry insiders.

Participants: 1,200 participants at the DigiWorld Summit and more than 5,000 at DigiWorld Week
Speakers: 120 speakers from around the world; 400 at DigiWorld Week
Partners and sponsors: over 100 partners and sponsors (businesses, public sector, media…)
Social media: 15,000 tweets (trending topics) and 2,000 live followers

Speakers in 2015 included: Jimmy WALES, Founder, Wikipedia – Peter VERHOEVEN, Managing Director EMEA, Booking.com – Alex SCHLEIFER, Head of Design, Airbnb – Eric DENOYER, CEO, Numericable-SFR – Dan JUDKINS, Head of Global Design and Development, Hasbro Inc. – Carlo d’ASARO BIONDO, President EMEA strategic relationships, Google – WEN Rui, Director of national Business Development, Youku Tudou – Sebastien SORIANO, Chairman, ARCEP – Bruno LASSERRE, Chair, French Competition Authority… > for more, go to www.digiworldsummit.com

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25Jan/160

[CR] Smart City Forum : First scorecard and new prospects

Smartcity_Forum

 

IDATE Insights : Philippe BAUDOUIN, Head of digital plan practice

5th edition of the Smart City Forum. This year with a focus on territorial strategy, and a second focus on the predictive analysis for the development of Smart Cities.

  • First challenge on climate change, especially with the COP21 conference organized in France.
    Smart City could allow making savings in terms of gas emission, equivalent to India production.
  • 5 years ago, Smart City was a hot topic for very few cities. In 2014, 50% of 100’000+ cities were involved in Smart City development. Besides, the Caisse des Dépôts launched an initiative to help smaller cities to develop Smart City initiatives as well.
  • Various approaches of the smart city : the block, the vertical, the citizen, …

 

Round-table: From experiments to strategic visions: how cities are becoming smart cities?

  • Norbert FRIANT, Responsable Service Aménagement et Usages du Numérique, Rennes Métropole
  • Benjamin FAVRIAU, Chef de projet Smart City, Mairie de Paris
  • Hélène ROUSSEL, Développement filière d’excellence, Montpellier Méditerranée Métropole

Smartcity_Forum

Flash-back regarding what have been done regarding smart cities in your city ?

Montpellier is working on smart city for 5 years, and is currently in the end of a learning phase. Legislative tools and synchronization are complex to develop such initiatives. In 2010, Montpellier has been involved in the label “Eco Cité” allowing the city to start a reflexion with IBM and local labs on Smart City. 4 fields investigated : mobility, floods prevention, risk management. Currently at the end of the trial phase.

Rennes has the moto “living smart” since 1983. The city is very involved in data use and management, thinking early of open data, big data. Worked with Dassault to develop projects around data and worked with Montpellier to co-create data-based services.

Paris started an initiative for Smart and Sustainable City since last elections. The idea was to provide tools to the city to achieve its main goal regarding mobility, wastes, … The city is therefore currently developing new tools around data, and try to federate an ecosystem around data.

The position of the local administration regarding the development of Smart City

In Rennes, the role of the city and the “Metropole” is to be a data “régie”. The aim is to gather data, and manage initiatives around data, stimulate an ecosystem, and provide a “citizen fabric”. One of the issues for a data-based application is to create an audience.

In Paris, the city managed to release data for now. The idea is to open a reflexion on data to all partners that could be interested in the use of data. The city try to develop a territorial sense to federate players around data.

In Montpellier, the city was involved on open data. The “metropole” was involved on its side on data already used. Montpellier is therefore between both initiatives.

There is beside a challenge on the Internet of Things and connected objects, and how to use and federate data generated by these objects placed on the city. Telcos are involved, software editors as well. In Rennes, they work with the development of open technical bricks. The role of the city is to stimulate the local ecosystem around smart city. Rennes worked with research labs around Lora and the Lora alliance.

It can be the charge of cities to define a de-facto standard, at the national level.

About the link between Smart City and the French tech ecosystem

In Montpellier, the dynamic have been lunched concretely in 2015, especially with the Big Data Challenge. The Smart City is an enabler of the French Tech initiative and ecosystem, and the development of start-up community.
Paris worked with Numa (start-up incubator), to develop applications around Big Data.
Rennes also worked on data-based applications, around geo-tourism, developing new services, tested by local citizens.
There is also a culture of “free of charge” services that is killing start-ups, living more or less on public subventions rather than on a sustainable business model. The other players that are correctly living on smart city are large players including SNCF, Google, Cisco, IBM. Some of them do not release their data and are blocking the development of big data, especially start-ups.
Rennes and Montpellier answered to a call for projects in 2014 and have been chosen : they have launched jointly 10 challenges on Big Data. 4 companies from Rennes and 4 from Montpellier are involved in these Challenges.

 

Keynote : Gabrielle GAUTHEY, Head of Investments, Caisse des Dépôts

Gabrielle Gauthey, Caisse des dépôts

Gabrielle Gauthey, Head of Investments - Caisse des dépôts

 

The smart city can take profit from the legacy city. The smart city is involved in the territorial transition, in the climate transition, the digital transition and the demographic transition.

How can we see the intelligence of a city (for the Caisse des Dépôts) :

  • More fluid
  • More sustainable
  • More sober
  • More resilient
  • More inclusive (social integration)

Some original example of mobility / smart city solutions provided in France :

  • Nantes developed a “pay-as-you-use” model for transport, bus, tram and train.
  • Lille developed the concept of shifting time mobility: you are paid to shift your working time to take the bus out of the peak hour.

Infrastructure is key for the development of Smart Cities, especially to gather and store the data.

There are also needs for fixed mutualized telecom networks that are neutral and provided by the city. “It is necessary to have an open infrastructure to avoid silos and to release innovation”.

Governance is necessary to manage initiatives (by the city especially), and the citizens have to be involved in the development of these initiatives and applications.

 

Roundtable - Are predictive technologies the next stage in the smart city’s development?

Moderated by : Albert ASSERAF, Directeur général stratégie, Etudes et Marketing France, J.C. Decaux

 

Presentation of round table members’ involvement in predictive analysis for Smart City:

SystemX: Research labs placed in the Paris-Saclay innovation cluster. Work especially on smart territories, and especially on predictive data analysis. To work on transportation systems, it is necessary to modelling transport networks in order to understand the how it works. It leads to understand how people flows are moving, by investigating at stations, analyzing location-based data from mobile operators, or location-based tweets.

IBM – Smarter Cities: Analytics is only one step among others on the “smart” aspect of the city. In 2020, there will be 1.7 Mbyte generated each second for each person around the world. It is therefore necessary to use these data to generate value, in order to improve living conditions in the city. IBM worked with the Chinese government to anticipate pollution levels 72 hours upstream. The territory have to stay at the center of the smart city initiative, and at the core of the governance.

Optimod – Lyon: technology is a mean and not a way to make investment. The main goal remains related to the city: mobility, environment, … Optimod deals with transportation in Lyon. The idea is to answer issues regarding environment: reducing gas emission, reducing transport costs (including cars and public transport). The first option is to change behaviors regarding cars, the other option is to change infrastructures. Digital can help changing things waiting for disruptive options in terms of transportation. Optimod works on predictive analysis especially for traffic lights optimization. Companies like Uber do not generate value, rather destroy value at the scale of the city. It is important to keep the value within the city and to preserve the economic ecosystem.

Ruckus Wireless: Californian company working on smart city communication infrastructures. Some developing countries are more advanced than developed countries in terms of Smart City initiative. In the US, Ruckus worked in San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Jose: developed services with real-time parking places available. Also analyzed data from SingTel in Singapore to know how long people are waiting for trains, by analyzing wifi connections density on the platform. In NYC, provide Wifi interactive hot-spots, to replace the existing phone booths, providing especially free calls over-wifi on these hot spots.

8Jan/160

[CR] Future Networks Forums : Welcome to the Gigabit era and virtualization?

Future networks wrap-up

The 2015 Digiworld summit sessions devoted to telecoms gave off a view on the move toward very high speeds in mobile, fixed and satellite and how this is strongly supported by the EC.

How mature are the technical solutions being used to supply Gigabit Internet?

How mature are the technical solutions being used to supply Gigabit Internet?

Customer push for higher speeds

The discussion started around customer needs. The Gigabit race is driven by a strong customer demand for speed and volume Mr. Maloberti highlighted. Customers need good network quality and experience and that is the reason why telcos will continue to invest in networks.
Valérie Chaillou, head of telecoms at IDATE confirmed this trend. She gave a wide panorama on VHB fixed broadband connections in the world. There were 265 million VHB fixed connections in the world as at end 2014 according to IDATE (three main architectures are considered as VHB: FTTH/B, FTTN and FTTx/D3.0 deployed by cablecos). FTTH/B is largely available in most-advanced Asian countries and the most deployed architecture among FTTX connections above VDSL and far from FTTxDOcsis3.0. At a regional level, major discrepancies remain.FTTx Docsis 3 dominates in North America while FTTH is the main technology deployed in other regions. Pierre Michel Attali had a more French focus and mentioned 3% of French people get fiber-based internet access at home. On the mobile side, Valérie Chaillou mentioned that more than 500 million LTE subscribers were registered at world level as at end December 2014. She illustrated how massive is LTE adoption among mobile operators and customers. Distribution of LTE mobile connections is not homogeneous and the most-advanced Asian countries are again eading the pack. China the guest country of this 37th edition of the Digiworld Summit jumped at the second world rank in the first half 2015 with a total of 225 million subscriptions (compared to almost 100 million at year-end 2014). And migration to LTE is really much faster than 3G.

A Gigabit race being run at a different pace across the globe, but with one thing in common: the growing involvement of local authorities

In the USA, Google fired the starting gun for the Gigabit race in the US. Google’s very local approach attracted a great deal of attention from cities which, when they failed to be chosen as one of the company’s rollout locations, elected to become involved in deploying their own infrastructures, in some instances in partnership with other local bodies such as universities. AT&T, which had initially focused its efforts on VDSL but is now also deploying FTTH networks, which has enabled the carrier to introduce its 1 Gbps Gigapower plan.

In Europe, Gigabit networks are also making headlines in Europe, although the situation is very different, largely because operators there are taking more wide-ranging technological and commercial approaches. Some were quick to gain a foothold in this new market, while others are waiting for market demand to build. Although the targets for connection speeds set in Europe Digital Agenda and mentioned by Anna K from the DG Connect are more modest, Gigabit-speed access could nevertheless become an industry standard for both public and private sector players, as local authorities begin to play a larger role in SFB/UFB network rollouts. The EC public consultation on the needs for internet speeds and quality beyond 2020 runs til December 7th, 2015.

Fixed, mobile and satellite are in the game

On the fixed side, several promising technologies to reach 1 Gbps. Valérie Chaillou highlighted that theoretically, several technologies (FTTH, Docsis3.1, FTTN) are capable of providing end users with a 1 Gbps connection. Naturally, end-to-end fibre connections are currently the fastest ones available. The technologies used by new solutions that rely in part on copper or coaxial networks, and which have recently been standardised, will become commercially available in the coming months.

A number of technologies on the mobile side should have a significant positive impact on mobile network performance: Licensed-Assisted Access (LAA) which will bring more flexibility to mobile operators for improving throughputs and capacity through the use of widely available and freely usable unlicensed spectrum, LTE Wi-Fi Aggregation/ LTE-H is expected to unify both LTE and Wi-Fi, improvements in carrier aggregation, adapting LTE for machine type communication, Device to Device (D2D) is a mode that enables two devices to discover themselves directly and communicate with or without the need for a network. 5G is expected to deliver 1 Gpbs internet. But 5G is at an early stage even widely accepted by the industry. 5G basic principles are widely accepted within the industry but it is in an early stage. It aims to provide 1000 times higher wireless area capacity and more varied service capabilities compared to 2010. The big change, understood to be the one that will not be compatible with LTE evolution, pertains to the new radio interfaces, which must be developed for 5G.
There are, currently, in the industry, many different proposals of foundations for those new air interfaces and there is still relatively little on the choice to be made. There are basically two types of air interfaces, one based on orthogonal waveform and that is more or less an evolution of that currently used in LTE OFDM, and another, based on non-orthogonal waveforms. To support those multiple waveforms, the frame structure will be adaptive.

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Jean-Hubert Lenotte from Eutelsat

But Jean-Hubert Lenotte from Eutelsat asserted satellite is coming back in the game. “Infrastructuer is the main bottleneck to more growth.”
He highlighted that satellite performs well compared to terrestrial standards and is also competitive in certain circumstances. "Cost for satellite is going down: divided by 5. Much more capacity on satellite, much more flexibility
Satellite is able to deliver high speed internet at reasonable cost in remote regions and rural areas where terrestrial infrastructure/coverage is lacking.

 

Is network virtualization a game changer?

In addition to the race in the deployment of fixed and mobile superfast systems (link to forum#1), networks’ future evolution is directly linked to the integration of cloud architectures and the virtualization solutions. The concepts of SDN, NFV and network virtualization are considered as the main upcoming technological disruptions in networking architectures and are at the heart of telcos’ and equipment suppliers’ strategies.

Round-table: Reality check

Moderated by : Vincent BONNEAU, Head of Innovation Business Unit

Mervyn KELLY, EMEA Marketing Director, Ciena
François LEMARCHAND, Head of SDN product strategy, Ericsson
Michael RITTER, Vice President Technical Marketing and Analyst Relations, Adva Optical
Laurent BILLES, VP Network Architecture, Orange Labs Networks, Orange

Software Defined Network and Network Function Virtualization are two very hot topics in the telecommunication industry. What are their benefits, what is the maturity of the solutions available, the challenges that will have to be faced and most importantly as well with which outlook for the coming years? Those were the questions raised and answered during this session at the Digiworld Summit 2015.

What are NFV and SDN?

SDN stands for Software Defined Network. It is the decoupling of the control plane and the user plane in the network. Network Function Virtualization on the other hand is the softwarization of network function that are run on legacy x86 IT servers rather than on dedicated and proprietary hardware today found in mobile networks.

Benefits

Several benefits can be listed

- Financial savings notably through CapEx and OpEx savings. While OpEx saving were mentioned as quite obvious in near future, interviewees were more cautious regarding possible CapEx saving, noting that it would take more time to materialize.

- Energy savings resulting from a more efficient and flexible network where resources can be pooled and distributed on the field depending on real usage,

- Time to Market: Virtualization of the network enable to launch services more quickly and thus to be more competitive and reactive on the market

- Foster innovation : thanks to the flexibility and agility that SDN and NFV enables, new services can be launched and the reliance of operators or service providers on infrastructure equipment provider development cycle is less important

Reality check

Although a hot topic, the stage of maturity of SDN and NFV is still at the beginning. Around 30 proof of concept have been demonstrated, some trials have been carried out, some commercial solutions are even available but very few commercial deployments so far.
What came out is the fact that for a greenfield operator, SDN and NFV can be deployed quite quickly and quite successfully. Challenges are met when SDN and NFV have to be integrated in existing network.
Interoperability today is a real issue. There are a lot of solutions from multiple vendors using very different standards. While the number of initiatives tells a lot about the opportunity that the industry sees in SDN and NFV, it also raises its own problems.
In this context, open source will be a key driver to enable interoperability between all vendors and more importantly to foster innovation by enabling new players to develop their own service.

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Challenges and impact on the industry

The two main challenges for the years to come will be the interoperability of solutions as well as the ability to handle security very seriously. Price of course is a big question. Of course, pricing should be more affordable but to what extent is the big question. By 10%? 20%? Currently we have not enough hindsight to give an answer to this question.
What is sure is the fact that SDN and NFV will have a big impact on the industry. Operators and service providers will have to move from a telecom centric environment to an IT centric environment, which is not a small thing for an operator. Indeed, Mobile Network Operators will have to rethink their organization and way of thinking. The transformation of infrastructure from a product to a service will usher many opportunities but surely require adaptation.
As warned during the session, business plans will have to be very conservative because we still lack some hindsight as most deployment will take place between 2018 and 2020

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