15Mar/170

Connected Cars & Future of the Mobile Ecosystem, interview with Thierry VIADIEU

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"Connected Cars & Future of the Mobile Ecosystem"
DigiWorld Economic Journal n°105

Interview with Thierry VIADIEU
Program Director for Connected Car & Autonomous Driving, RENAULT

Conducted by Yves GASSOT, CEO, IDATE DigiWorld Institute

DW Economic Journal: Could you describe the scope of your responsibilities at Renault?

 

Thierry VIADIEU: As far as connected cars are concerned, the field of endeavour for the Product Planning and Programs department covers on-board systems (multimedia systems), offboard systems (servers) and connected services. For autonomous vehicles, it covers autonomy and the components that enable that autonomy (sensors, radars, cameras, LIDAR, etc.).
Our task is to ensure that what we want to deliver to our customers (as set out by the Product Engineering and Sales and Marketing departments) is properly expressed, then taken into account by those in charge of development. We give them the budget they need, and we ensure that the plan they put into effect lines up with their mandate. These projects are then contracted with the Vehicles Program departments which will adopt these developments and we commit to results.
Over the course of its lifespan, we ensure that the project is on track and make the necessary decisions when it deviates. Top management receives progress reports on a regular basis.

We often associate the notion of the self-driving car with that of the connected car, as the latter is a stage in and a prerequisite for making a car autonomous. But users are not terribly clear on exactly what services a connected car provides. What does Renault offer its customers in this regard? And which applications do you believe are the most promising for the next five years? Can you share any figures on your connected car output?

Autonomy and connectivity cover two different technical fields, and exist independently of one another. But of course the autonomous car will be highly connected.
The connected car has been around for some time. For instance, the traffic information given by navigation systems requires connectivity. Today, through its RLink systems, Renault offers a range of connected services: traffic information, Coyote, access to e-mail, access to a variety of apps from the app store, data for fleet management or pay-as-you-drive insurance contracts, opening car doors using a smartphone for car-sharing services (RAccess), and so on.
In a not too distant future, the range of services on offer will be very broad and cover different value fields such as monitoring the state of the vehicle (preventive maintenance), remote actions (setting the vehicle's inside temperature, opening the boot for deliveries), easy driving (booking parking spots, travel recommendations), mobility services (opening doors with a smartphone, multimodal solutions), personalised virtual assistant with connections to one's digital devices (links to calendars, appointment bookings, restaurant reservations, etc.). Depending on their needs, each customer will choose the services they find most useful.
The job of the autonomous car is to gradually relieve drivers of certain driving tasks, aiming to take a complete control of the vehicle. This will give drivers more time to do other things during their drive time, so an advanced connectivity solution will be absolutely vital to the offer of autonomy. This offer could go as far as the ability to work in one's car, and videoconference from the vehicle.

The ubiquity of the smartphone and the apps designed for the two main platforms, iOS and Android, is pushing car-makers to offer drivers the ability to replicate the familiar digital environment on their vehicle's display. At the same time, car-makers also want to protect the independence of their relationship with customers for certain services, such as maintenance. What are the services that the car manufacturer must deliver directly or indirectly, but independently from mobile application platforms?

A fluid relationship between the customer's smartphone and the car's multimedia system (which we call smartphone integration) is key to ensuring the digital continuity our customers demand. That being said, we need to keep in mind that – while awaiting the autonomous vehicle – the driver is still in the driver's seat, and any activity that might distract her/him and threaten her/his safety must be avoided. This is why certain apps are "replicated" in the multimedia system, and in a very strict fashion. So drivers will have access to a very limited number of their smartphone's features.
As to the relationship with the two digital giants, Google and Apple, it is clear that all car-makers have certain concerns over the ultimate consequences of smartphone integration. Some have taken the path of defining integration standards that allow them not to rely on those developed by Google and Apple, while others have even announced they would not be offering those applications.
At Renault we have chosen to offer CarPlay (Apple) and Android Auto because we think that's what our customers want. On the other hand, we are very careful about creating a balanced relationship and about the data being relayed, by ensuring that it in no way jeopardises our customers, or our business models.
To illustrate the merits of having a good relationship between the car-maker and an application, let's use the simple example of looking for a petrol station. An application that indicates all of the petrol stations in the vicinity is clearly useful when we are driving and need to fill up. However, its value increases tremendously if it can also gauge how full the tank is and tell us the best time and place (cost, mileage remaining) to fill up the tank.

The car dealership obviously has a very important role in selling vehicles and promoting the latest innovations, and in maintenance and customer relations. In what way do you take this into account? What is their role today, and how will it change in future?

Renault dealers play a key role in our relationship with customers, and in informing them about our products. We believe this will continue to be the case with connected services. Naturally this relationship is evolving as customers are getting more and more information from the internet, and are able to discover products online from home, but it is undeniable that physical contact with a product and an informed representative will remain an important ingredient in quality of service. As proof, I offer up the direction being taken by certain major internet companies, such as Amazon, which plan on opening up brick and mortar shops in major cities. In this respect, the density and proximity of the Renault network is a major asset that we will be sure to leverage.
We can also cite the initiative taken by a number of Renault dealerships which offer what we could call "RLink genius bar sessions" to give customers an opportunity to familiarise themselves with the system.

When we move into the autonomous car stage, we have to stress the impact of regulatory imperatives, of consumers' reactions – be they enthusiastic or disoriented – and the influence and role of the internet big five (GAFAM) and of new entrants: could you comment on these central issues and challenges ahead?

Regulation is a very important, so as not to say crucial aspect. Laws and regulations will need to evolve to allow extensive use of the autonomous car, and Renault is naturally involved in the discussions that are underway on the matter. It is a difficult exercise because, as with most car-makers, we sell our models in a great many locations around the globe, and there is still no overall regulatory framework that applies to autonomous cars.
On the matter of users, I think they have a tremendous ability to adapt, and when the services on offer are useful and have been carefully designed, there will be no obstacles to adopting them. On the contrary!
For us, the internet giants are certainly potential partners. As with all of our partners and suppliers, we look closely at what they can offer us, while also be vigilant about the skills and responsibilities we want to maintain or acquire. Today, they appear to be positioned solely in the driverless autonomous car, and we don't know if one day they will be direct competitors.

What are the most strategic technological developments that self-driving car vendors will need to master? What R&D and partnership (with its peers, and with electronics and IT companies) policies is Renault putting into place? Do you think that the costs associated with the connected/autonomous car will drive a period of consolidation in the automotive industry?

When it comes to the development of autonomous cars, the different sensors that become the car's "eyes and ears" naturally play a major role. They will evolve, be able to "see" farther and under any conditions (snow, rain, etc.), will be increasingly reliable and especially increasingly affordable so that all product ranges can benefit from them.
But if there is one area in which all automotive manufacturers, and of course the Renault-Nissan alliance, are investing massively, it is the development of the software that will manage all of the vehicles' sensors and systems. We need to develop the right algorithms, incorporate elements of artificial intelligence, ensure the robustness of zero-fault execution (the bugs that are such a familiar part of our daily lives are "forbidden" in an autonomous car, whose software needs to be as robust and reliable as the software that drives the most sensitive installations) and have a self-learning capacity that allows it to improve on an ongoing basis.
I believe this is the key to the development of the mass-produced autonomous car.
As to the impact on a consolidation of the automotive industry, this sector has already undergone considerable consolidation in recent years, creating several "titans" that produce more than 8 million vehicles a year, and I expect to see more close partnerships over certain technologies rather than corporate mergers.

The autonomous car will generate thousands of Gigabytes, often with stringent quality and latency requirements that will mean connectivity costs cannot be overlooked in vendors' business models. What are your views on this? Do you believe, like some, that your business model will include monetising some of the data generated? How much are you banking on the advent of 5G which is currently mobilising the telecoms industry?

Today, the cost of relaying data over the GSM network is a significant element in connected services' business model. The use of a SIM card that allows users to switch from operator to operator, or plans that allow them to pool or spread out their consumption are important factors in limiting the impact of this cost. As is monetising generated data. That being said, data traffic still carries a high price tag in some countries which creates an impediment to deploying services to all of our customers around the world.
Regarding 5G, naturally we are keeping a close watch over its development, but current projections indicate that coverage will still be very slim in 2020, so we cannot concentrate our developments for the next five years around 5G.
We often stress the time lapse between automotive industry cycles (four to five years) and digital innovation cycles. But if we take the example of the transition from LTE to 5G we see that, even in the digital world, not everything progresses as quickly as the latest version of WhatsApp or the rollout of the latest smartphone model…

The vision for the connected car, as for the self-driving car, needs to be part of a more wide-reaching thought process devoted to the different components of the digital transformation that is affecting mobility: the servicisation of car use, the influence of the first car-sharing platforms and ride services, how cities are changing, smart roads, etc. What initiatives are you taking with respect to these various trends, and how would you describe a car-marker 10 years from now?

As with most other car-makers, Renault is not focusing all of its attention or investments on the development of the car solely, even if it is autonomous and connected. Either directly or by having a stake in other ventures, we are interested in all aspects of innovation in what we call the mobile digital ecosystem (car sharing, car pooling, multimodality, peer-to-peer rental, etc.). It is also an opportunity to engage in discussions and run trials in large cities such as Lyon and Bordeaux where Renault is partnered with Bolloré.
Here, it is likely that the development of the autonomous car will run parallel to investments in outfitting roadways (smart roads and motorways), paving the way for new forms of mobility. One of the challenges will be managing the co-existence of classic cars and autonomous (possibly driverless) cars within a complex environment.
To answer your last question, I tend to believe that ten years from now the car-makers that remain – and of course the Renault-Nissan Alliance will be among them! – will be similar to car-makers today in many respects. We will undoubtedly see a shift in the value chain, and an expansion of car-makers' business into mobility products and closer ties with the digital world. But at the centre of all this is an object – the car – which is more and more technologically complex and subject to increasingly stringent regulations (security, emissions, CO2). This is what constitutes an automotive manufacturer's core business, and what I believe explains why there are virtually no new entrants to the sector.

 

Thierry VIADIEU. RENAULT Program Director for Connected Car (since 2012) and Autonomous Driving (since 2016). Graduated from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Ingénieurs Electrotechniciens de Grenoble in 1985 and received a PhD in Material Science from the University of Grenoble in 1988. Entered RENAULT in 1988 as research engineer. Then RENAULT Powertrain Division from 1992 until 1999 working on programs and strategy. Moved to NISSAN Headquarter in 1999 after the signature of the Alliance, starting in Manufacturing Strategy. Moved to NISSAN Corporate Planning in 2003 as General Manager and became NISSAN Corporate Vice President in 2005. In 2006, moved to NISSAN Thailand as ASEAN VP. In 2009 became RENAULT-NISSAN b.v. Director for Alliance Powertrain Planning.


31Jan/170

Aménagement numérique en Guinée Conakry : présentation des conclusions du SDAN par IDATE DigiWorld au Ministre des Télécoms

ATTALI_Pierre_Michel_NB

Pierre-Michel ATTALI,
Directeur du Pôle Territoires Numériques
contacter

 

La Guinée Conakry occupe une position particulière sur la côte Atlantique de l'Afrique de l'Ouest avec six pays limitrophes (Guinée-Bissau, Sénégal, Mali, Sierra Leone, Libéria, Côte d'Ivoire), un fort potentiel hydro-électrique grâce à la présence de nombreux fleuves (Sénégal, Niger, Gambie, ...) et des ressources minières importantes comme la bauxite par exemple.

En matière de réseaux de communications électroniques, la Guinée  a adopté le 13 août 2015 une loi qui doit permettre notamment une concurrence effective et un développement des investissements privés sur l’ensemble du territoire, avec l'objectif de supprimer toute barrière à l'entrée des opérateurs et de limiter au maximum les coûts de déploiement grâce à la mutualisation et au partage des infrastructures.

La Guinée bénéficie d'une situation relativement favorable en matière d'accès à la bande passante internationale via le câble ACE (entre la France et l'Afrique du Sud avec le raccordement de nombreux pays de la côté ouest de l'Afrique). Et l'Etat s'est engagé dans une politique volontariste d'aménagement numérique de son territoire, avec la mise en œuvre d'un backbone national fibres optiques de près de 4000 km, qui sera achevé fin 2017 et qui maille le territoire national avec la desserte de 76 villes. Ce backbone sera exploité et commercialisé par la SOGEB une société anonyme contrôlée à l'heure actuelle à 100% par l'Etat Guinéen mais dont le capital a vocation à être ouvert partiellement à des opérateurs privés, dans un modèle d'opérateur d'opérateurs avec un réseau neutre, activé, ouvert à tous les opérateurs de détail dans des conditions transparentes et non discriminatoires.

Le Pôle Territoires Numériques de l'IDATE réalise actuellement, avec ses partenaires LM Ingénierie et le cabinet d'avocats CMS Francis Lefebvre, le schéma directeur d'aménagement numérique (SDAN) de la Guinée et a présenté les conclusions du SDAN le 14 décembre 2016 au Ministre des Postes, des Télécommunications et de l'Economie Numérique, Monsieur Moustapha Mamy Diaby.

Le SDAN fait l'objet de préconisations déclinées en 5 axes et 23 mesures opérationnelles concrètes portant sur les évolutions réglementaires, la poursuite des investissements en complément du backbone national, le montage juridique et financier pour l'exploitation et la commercialisation du réseau d'opérateur d'opérateurs, le soutien à la demande en matière de TIC, et la mise en œuvre de  formations initiales et qualifiantes dans le domaine des TIC.

En Guinée,  la mise en œuvre d'un réseau d'initiative publique d'opérateur d'opérateurs, ayant vocation à accueillir des partenaires privés, neutre, activé, ouvert à tous les opérateurs dans les mêmes conditions apparaît comme la solution efficace pour l'aménagement numérique du territoire ... avec une singulière résonnance avec le "modèle français" mis en œuvre chez nous.

 Pour suivre l’actualité de l’économie numérique, n’oubliez pas de vous inscrire à notre newsletter

 

31Jan/170

Invest in the digital future?

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Yves Gassot,
CEO, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

The question has been raised, and rightly so. The digital transformation that is expressing itself through the swift and constant stream of innovation and growing achievement (the cloud, ultrafast access, IoT, big data, AI, VR, etc.) is enthralling for many of us, but a source of deep concern for many others.

A sizeable percentage of the population on both sides of the Atlantic do not even think about it, while having become heavy consumers of all things digital, or see it simply as the inexorable eradication of jobs as robot technology takes hold. Leading economists are pondering the decrease in productivity gains, the polarisation of the labour force, the creation of a deflationist and stagnant economy. They wonder whether the “digital revolution” can still be considered a driving force behind a new economic revival and the source of wealth creation, in the same way that the steam engine and electricity once were.

We ourselves believe firmly that any desire to step back from digital progress is a dead end. On the contrary, we need to galvanise our country by investing more, as much in training, as in scientific culture, research and innovation, and of course interweaving digital technology and the transition to other sources of energy. But the argument, the push for inclusion – a byword at Davos this year – and solidarity mechanisms also need to be more widely developed and rethought.

Support from the World Bank and the OECD for reviving investments, especially in infrastructure, will no doubt raise a new series of questions in the coming months. For IDATE DigiWorld, the questions on our minds that pertain to our main areas of focus include:

. How much of a priority should be given to financing new generation ultrafast fixed (FTTH) and mobile (5G) networks?
. What is the logic behind telcos’ investments in content? And, more generally, why should telcos invest in diversifying their business?
. Which innovations (wearables, VR, digital assistants, connected cars…) could take over from the smartphone as key growth drivers?
. At what point can we expect to see a return on investment for the cloud, IoT, big data, etc. rollouts of the past several years in all of the major sectors? Could this “4th industrial revolution” be Europe’s chance to return to centre stage in the digital world?

Here then, in this first newsletter of the year, are some of the topics we have begun to contemplate with our Members, and which will undoubtedly be explored in detail as part of our various initiatives, our monthly DigiWorld Clubs in Brussels, London and Paris, the DigiWorld Future symposiums in the spring (18 May in Brussels, 23 May in London and 6 June in Paris), and of course the DigiWorld Summit, which will run from 14 to 16 November this year.

So 2017 is shaping up to be a year of lively and crucial debate!

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17Nov/160

The Digital Promise in Africa: Singular development models

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Didier Pouillot & Sophie Lubrano , IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Faced with the challenge of digitising government operations, the economy and everyday life, Africa is innovating with singular development models that make use of the latest technologies.

Africa has a number of singular features that have carried over into an original development model. First, the weak purchasing power in most countries has driven the rise of a low-cost market, both for services and mobile handsets, primarily with a prepaid model. The transition to data services could follow the same path, dominated by low-end plans billed based on data volume. Further down the road, Africa’s growing middle class will make it possible to move beyond the low-cost approach and foster the development of value-added products.

The region has also managed to capitalise on the latest technologies, leapfrogging over several stages of development, starting with the use of wireless technologies for accessing the Web. The continent should also benefit eventually from upcoming innovations such as constellations (drones, balloons, micro–satellites) to bring access to rural areas. Lastly, Africa has been a seedbed of innovations in services, in the financial arena (e.g. the well-known success of e-money), health, farming and education. Also noteworthy is the development of entertainment services, with well established film and TV production hubs and the more recent video game hubs.

Africa’s digital industry is expanding, with the creation of technology hubs, incubators for start-ups, regional trade and collaboration networks, bolstered by the support of local governments and global digital industry leaders.

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DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

World Telecom Services Market: Trends & Analyses, July to December 2015 – Jan. 2016
World LTE market & MBB spectrum: Markets at June 2015 & Forecasts to 2019
World FTTx market: Markets at December 2015 & Forecasts to 2020 – Jul. 2016
Telco investment challenges: CapEx dynamics – Dec. 2015

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15Nov/160

Blockchain & Financial market transformation: The challenges and opportunities of FinTech for the financial industry

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Bertrand Copigneaux
Senior Consultant, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Banking has long represented a big market for IT and digital technologies. It is probably one of the sectors that has invested the most in information technologies over time, for retail banking activities, and more recently for risk control systems to ensure compliance with banking and finance regulations.

More recently, however, digital innovation in this sector has been overtaken by the explosion of FinTech. Hundreds of start-ups have demonstrated the potential to innovate and transform the banking and finance as we know it. In light of recent events, several areas of innovation have emerged from the development of FinTech, either in competition or partnership with veteran banking industry players.

Every corner of the financial sector is affected, from payment solutions, to credit and lending activities faced with crowdsourced alternatives, the use of blockchains and cryptocurrency-based solutions, to the emergence of high frequency trading, big data analysis solutions and AI roboadvisors.

These technologies are disrupting the finance ecosystem, and paving the way for new players, and new business models. They also open up opportunities for the industry to transform itself and become more efficient and profitable.

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DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

Blockchain, Oct. 2016
Mobile Payment: The state of the industry, amid new stakes, Apr. 2016

 

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15Nov/160

Ultra-Fast Broadband Public Policies Does any one country provide a model of reference?

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Pierre-Michel Attali & Nicolas Moreno, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Europe 2020, the key document in Europe’s growth strategy for the coming years, published by the EuropeanCommission in May 2010, unveiled the objectives of the Digital Agenda for Europe (DAE).

 

One of the main questions concerns the efficiency of the different national plans (technological approach, funding, regulation…) which have been designed to achieve the objectives of the DAE.

National programme objectives in sync with the Digital Agenda for Europe

With the exception of France, whose coverage objectives are two years behind Europe’s, and Sweden which does not have specific time-related targets, many national plans are in line with DAE coverage objectives. Most European countries have also set additional targets, in most cases to achieve more ambitious UFB objectives, either in terms of connection speeds (France, Italy) or time frame (Germany, Sweden).

Currently disparate landscape

The disparate coverage levels in European countries cannot be attributed to any single factor, but rather to a combination of demographics, technological choices and the strength of private investment. Each European country has established a public policy (objectives, technologies) based on its own situation and features. These national plans are vital but in themselves not enough to achieve complete superfast coverage, or nationwide ultrafast 100 Mbps coverage down the road.

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DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

World FTTx market: Markets at December 2015 & Forecasts to 2020,July 2016
Digital Agenda Europe, Europe (EU-28) at the end of 2015, July 2016
Public policies for UFB, Benchmarking 7 countries in relation to the Digital Agenda for Europe, June 2016
Telco investment challenges, CapEX dynamics, Dec. 2015

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26Oct/160

Internet of Things markets The promises of a very fragmented market

ROPERT_Samuel

Samuel Ropert
Lead IoT Expert , IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Although the Internet of Things is a powerful concept, it is not necessarily a market in and of itself. IoT encompasses a very disparate array of fields that need to be examined separately, to obtain an accurate understanding of their particular features, and their true growth potential. 

 

More operationally, beyond cost savings opportunities (mainly through various internal optimisations), with more and more connected objects, new services will emerge – chiefly through the connectivity itself (remote control applications), but also via the data generated by the machines. Leading industrial heavyweights already have their own data-oriented department.

On the industrial side, two approaches can be distinguished: traditional machine-to-machine and the ‘industrial internet’: the latter referring to an interconnected ecosystem and the former to a more siloed approach. In the main, the creation of value in the industrial Internet lies in data collection and analysis. The main question then for market players is how to collect data and analyse them, to then generate revenue. The bulk of M2M revenue should come from software and IT integration as primary applications, with the aim of enabling massive savings within verticals. Consequently, all providers are working on delivering an end-to-end solution with a strong service bent – even if this might require acquisitions for some verticals.

Applied to the consumer world, the Internet of Things (IoT) refers to smart home and connected objects in general, relatively new markets that are starting to take off. Even if questions are being raised over the sustainability of their adoption. The main reason is the lack of services attached to these objects, apart from remote use, through a mobile app. Many applications would be based on data generated by those things. However, unlike the industrial market, data privacy is a major concern here as it involves consumers’ approval. The blurred lines around privacy regulation have made all of the ecosystem’s players reluctant to provide consumer market solutions. Another hurdle is to determine what value-added comes from connecting these objects, and how to monetise the data they generate: will all objects be connected? Will all data be valuable? If so, how valuable?

 

DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

 • M2M: a new momentum, Automotive, Consumer Electronics & Utilities the main drivers for consisting growth, Dec. 2015

Smart Home, A promising market, taking off slowly, Dec. 2015

Telcos’ Connected Objects Strategies, How to compete with OTT players, Apr.2016

Industrial Internet, Towards the 4th industrial revolution, June 2016

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18Oct/160

Total SDN and NFV market valued at 19 billion EUR in 2020

RAMAHANDRY_Tiana

Tiana Ramahandry
Senior Consultant, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

 

A mini share of the global telecom and IT equipment market, but a maximum impact on the networks’ capabilities

 

72 telco SDN/NFV projects benchmarked

The latest IDATE report – “State of the SDN/NFV market” – spotlights the main pioneering players in terms of SDN/NFV implementation, and what they are doing today. The report provides a separate dataset with 72 detailed project fact sheets as of August 2016, as well as an analysis of major stakeholders – telcos and vendors – and their strategies to evolve and transform their networks to a software-based infrastructure.

“These projects are at different stages, ranging from trial to deployment, but a few (36%) have achieved a commercial launch. Whatever their level of development, most of these projects are taking place in developed countries: Europe, the US, Japan, South Korea and China,” says Tiana Ramahandry, the report’s project leader.

SDN/NFV projects per status

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Source: IDATE DigiWorld, State of SDN/NFV and network investments, September 2016

Telcos’ adoption of SDN and NFV over the long term

IDATE DigiWorld analysts provide SDN/NFV market sizing data, with coming investment forecasts up to 2020. Even this market, which is expected to reach almost 19 billion EUR by 2020, remains very marginal compared to the telecom and IT equipment market, which itself is estimated at over 300 billion EUR, transformation potential in network management will be huge, as will telcos’ opportunities to adopt new services and innovative business models.

While a modest part of the global SDN and NFV market will be captured by telcos in 2020, NFV is being implemented more and more with the growing number of cloud and SDN solutions being introduced for new business services. Telcos’ large-scale deployments are expected to begin in 2016, and their CAGR over the next five years is projected to stand at 47%.

Indeed, the vast majority of the market will come from enterprises and cloud service providers that were the first to adopt SDN for use in datacentres, for both internal operations and connections with other datacentres.

Discover the perspectives,  key trends, and scenarios about "SDN & NFV market" and contact Tiana Ramahandry for further information.
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28Sep/160

DigiWorld Summit: The Digital Trust Economy

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Debate over the crucial role that trust will play in the digital economy’s future

 

The 38th annual DigiWorld Summit will run from 15 – 17 November 2016, and have as its central theme: The Internet of Trust. It will be an opportunity to engage in a meaningful international debate over digital trust issues – starting with security and privacy – which have become major sources of concern for all of the ecosystem’s stakeholders.

As the number of reported cyber-attacks worldwide is growing by close to 40% a year, we expect that upcoming stages in digital technologies’ evolution will only amplify the phenomenon. And this to such an extent that any future scenario is possible: from a continuation of the current chaos to a breakdown in trust that would lead to the construction of a new digital economy, which will no doubt differ in many respects from the one we know today.=

Are we reaching a tolerance threshold for online trust?
How can veteran digital industry players (equipment suppliers, telcos, IT companies) capitalise on the current climate?
Are verticals threatened by the situation or, on the contrary, on the winning side of trust and security issues?
Do we need a new regulatory framework to govern, or reassure, market players and consumers?

> Including the 120 speakers on this edition:
•    Eva BERNEKE, CEO, KMD
•    Anne BOUVEROT, CEO, Morpho
•    Isabelle FALQUE-PIERROTIN, Chairwoman, CNIL
•    Pierre, CHAPPAZ, Co-founder & Executive Chairman, Teads
•    Didier LAMOUCHE, President & CEO, Oberthur
•    Joseph LUBIN, Founder & CEO, ConsenSys, Co-Founder Ethereum
•    Carlos LOPEZ BLANCO, Global Head, Public and Regulatory Affairs, Telefónica
•    Stéphane RICHARD, Chairman & CEO, Orange
•    Corrado SCIOLLA, President Europe, BT Global Services
•    Nicolas SEKKAKI, CEO France, IBM

Choosing the theme for the 2016 DigiWorld Summit came about quite naturally. The vast majority of IDATE DigiWorld were eager to tackle the topic of trust.
For some time now, trust has been recognised as a vital ingredient in the success of a brand, an economy or a society. This is all the more true in a world being transformed by digital innovation. In its scenarios for 2025, IDATE DigiWorld underscored that trust was one of the key variables in tomorrow’s digital ecosystem. To shore up this belief, we need only look at some recent headlines:

•    the cyberattacks against telcos, TV networks and government agencies,
•    the legal wrangles between Apple and WhatsApp and government authorities wanting access to the encryption key for the devices or messages;
    the very drawn out European Union negotiations over new data protection rules;
•     the end of the Safe Harbor transatlantic agreement and ensuing debates over the new Privacy Shield;
    questions over the dangers surrounding connected/driverless cars, and the growing ubiquity of the IoT in general;
    the ad–blocking phenomenon;
    questions over what impact multiple FinTech solutions will have on the soundness of the banking system, and blockchain’s ability to replace today’s trusted third parties;
So trust is a focal point for telcos, cloud computing companies, Internet giants, start–ups, governments and regulators, but also for every economic sector across the board, not to mention consumers and citizens.
And, as always, acknowledging risk must not prevent us from also analysing opportunities, in terms of innovation, differentiation strategies and the competitive advantages available to many market players.

Once again this year, the vital meeting place that this international conference has become, will include plenary sessions that will provide a springboard for a series of high–level specialty forums.  These forums are an opportunity to delve deeper into the main trends we expect to see in mobile networks with the advent of 5G, ultrafast broadband, the Internet of Things, the TV market’s transformation in Europe, FinTech, video games, the digital promise in Africa and what makes a smart city.

A unique international forum for debate and networking

> DigiWorld Week
A week devoted to understanding what makes our new digital world tick (12 – 20 November 2016)
> The DigiWorld Awards
Recognising the best digital start-ups created by French entrepreneurs abroad

Key facts & figures

Europe’s trailblazing conference on the digital economy

The DigiWorld Summit is an annual event organised and hosted by IDATE experts, with the support of DigiWorld Institute members. Every year it holds ultra high-level international debates on the core issues shaping the digital economy, with the finest speakers and industry insiders.

Participants: 1,200 participants at the DigiWorld Summit and more than 5,000 at DigiWorld Week
Speakers: 120 speakers from around the world; 400 at DigiWorld Week
Partners and sponsors: over 100 partners and sponsors (businesses, public sector, media…)
Social media: 15,000 tweets (trending topics) and 2,000 live followers

For more information, visit our website: www.digiworldsummit.com

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19Jul/160

Mobile payment: M-commerce market revenue will likely grow from 2015 to 2019 at a CAGR of 26.5%

Hao_Yi

Hao Yi Emerging technologies expert, IDATE DigiWorld

The development of the mobile payment market was still heterogeneous in 2015.

 

 

The m-commerce payment market grew steadily, whereas the in-store mobile payment market remained nascent given the transaction volume, although the release of Apple Pay one year earlier had seemingly put an end to the doubts about near field communication (NFC) being the right technology for in-store proximity payment.

MCommerce_revenues_annual_growth_rate_eCommerce_v2

IDATE DigiWorld estimates that the worldwide m-commerce market revenue will likely grow from 2015 to 2019 at a CAGR of 26.5%, growing its share 26% of the overall value of the e-commerce market to 44.2%. As regards the arrival of in-store mobile payments with NFC technology, QR code, mobile wallets, mobile point-of-sale (mPOS) solutions and other mobile payment methods, IDATE DigiWorld values their transaction volume to grow at a CAGR of 74% between 2015 and 2019. The volume of in-store mobile payments is tiny compared to the trillions of USD of all point-of-sale (POS) transactions.

On the in-store payment market, no one has really ‘wined out’ as yet, although Internet giants (Apple, Google and Samsung) as well as card networks (Visa and MasterCard) are very active, and numerous new entrants are flooding in.

In addition, NFC payment working with mobile wallets did not see the expected explosion in volume. Even though the technology and NFC-enabled POS terminals have been progressively in place for many years, the perceived value of such services is low for consumers.

From the perspective of merchants, mobile payment alone is not enough to bring about mass adoption.

Find out more about this market in our dedicated report

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