31Jan/170

Aménagement numérique en Guinée Conakry : présentation des conclusions du SDAN par IDATE DigiWorld au Ministre des Télécoms

ATTALI_Pierre_Michel_NB

Pierre-Michel ATTALI,
Directeur du Pôle Territoires Numériques
contacter

 

La Guinée Conakry occupe une position particulière sur la côte Atlantique de l'Afrique de l'Ouest avec six pays limitrophes (Guinée-Bissau, Sénégal, Mali, Sierra Leone, Libéria, Côte d'Ivoire), un fort potentiel hydro-électrique grâce à la présence de nombreux fleuves (Sénégal, Niger, Gambie, ...) et des ressources minières importantes comme la bauxite par exemple.

En matière de réseaux de communications électroniques, la Guinée  a adopté le 13 août 2015 une loi qui doit permettre notamment une concurrence effective et un développement des investissements privés sur l’ensemble du territoire, avec l'objectif de supprimer toute barrière à l'entrée des opérateurs et de limiter au maximum les coûts de déploiement grâce à la mutualisation et au partage des infrastructures.

La Guinée bénéficie d'une situation relativement favorable en matière d'accès à la bande passante internationale via le câble ACE (entre la France et l'Afrique du Sud avec le raccordement de nombreux pays de la côté ouest de l'Afrique). Et l'Etat s'est engagé dans une politique volontariste d'aménagement numérique de son territoire, avec la mise en œuvre d'un backbone national fibres optiques de près de 4000 km, qui sera achevé fin 2017 et qui maille le territoire national avec la desserte de 76 villes. Ce backbone sera exploité et commercialisé par la SOGEB une société anonyme contrôlée à l'heure actuelle à 100% par l'Etat Guinéen mais dont le capital a vocation à être ouvert partiellement à des opérateurs privés, dans un modèle d'opérateur d'opérateurs avec un réseau neutre, activé, ouvert à tous les opérateurs de détail dans des conditions transparentes et non discriminatoires.

Le Pôle Territoires Numériques de l'IDATE réalise actuellement, avec ses partenaires LM Ingénierie et le cabinet d'avocats CMS Francis Lefebvre, le schéma directeur d'aménagement numérique (SDAN) de la Guinée et a présenté les conclusions du SDAN le 14 décembre 2016 au Ministre des Postes, des Télécommunications et de l'Economie Numérique, Monsieur Moustapha Mamy Diaby.

Le SDAN fait l'objet de préconisations déclinées en 5 axes et 23 mesures opérationnelles concrètes portant sur les évolutions réglementaires, la poursuite des investissements en complément du backbone national, le montage juridique et financier pour l'exploitation et la commercialisation du réseau d'opérateur d'opérateurs, le soutien à la demande en matière de TIC, et la mise en œuvre de  formations initiales et qualifiantes dans le domaine des TIC.

En Guinée,  la mise en œuvre d'un réseau d'initiative publique d'opérateur d'opérateurs, ayant vocation à accueillir des partenaires privés, neutre, activé, ouvert à tous les opérateurs dans les mêmes conditions apparaît comme la solution efficace pour l'aménagement numérique du territoire ... avec une singulière résonnance avec le "modèle français" mis en œuvre chez nous.

 Pour suivre l’actualité de l’économie numérique, n’oubliez pas de vous inscrire à notre newsletter

 

31Jan/170

Invest in the digital future?

Gassot-Yves

Yves Gassot,
CEO, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

The question has been raised, and rightly so. The digital transformation that is expressing itself through the swift and constant stream of innovation and growing achievement (the cloud, ultrafast access, IoT, big data, AI, VR, etc.) is enthralling for many of us, but a source of deep concern for many others.

A sizeable percentage of the population on both sides of the Atlantic do not even think about it, while having become heavy consumers of all things digital, or see it simply as the inexorable eradication of jobs as robot technology takes hold. Leading economists are pondering the decrease in productivity gains, the polarisation of the labour force, the creation of a deflationist and stagnant economy. They wonder whether the “digital revolution” can still be considered a driving force behind a new economic revival and the source of wealth creation, in the same way that the steam engine and electricity once were.

We ourselves believe firmly that any desire to step back from digital progress is a dead end. On the contrary, we need to galvanise our country by investing more, as much in training, as in scientific culture, research and innovation, and of course interweaving digital technology and the transition to other sources of energy. But the argument, the push for inclusion – a byword at Davos this year – and solidarity mechanisms also need to be more widely developed and rethought.

Support from the World Bank and the OECD for reviving investments, especially in infrastructure, will no doubt raise a new series of questions in the coming months. For IDATE DigiWorld, the questions on our minds that pertain to our main areas of focus include:

. How much of a priority should be given to financing new generation ultrafast fixed (FTTH) and mobile (5G) networks?
. What is the logic behind telcos’ investments in content? And, more generally, why should telcos invest in diversifying their business?
. Which innovations (wearables, VR, digital assistants, connected cars…) could take over from the smartphone as key growth drivers?
. At what point can we expect to see a return on investment for the cloud, IoT, big data, etc. rollouts of the past several years in all of the major sectors? Could this “4th industrial revolution” be Europe’s chance to return to centre stage in the digital world?

Here then, in this first newsletter of the year, are some of the topics we have begun to contemplate with our Members, and which will undoubtedly be explored in detail as part of our various initiatives, our monthly DigiWorld Clubs in Brussels, London and Paris, the DigiWorld Future symposiums in the spring (18 May in Brussels, 23 May in London and 6 June in Paris), and of course the DigiWorld Summit, which will run from 14 to 16 November this year.

So 2017 is shaping up to be a year of lively and crucial debate!

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Filed under: Internet, Telecom No Comments
17Nov/160

The Digital Promise in Africa: Singular development models

pouillot_lubrano

Didier Pouillot & Sophie Lubrano , IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Faced with the challenge of digitising government operations, the economy and everyday life, Africa is innovating with singular development models that make use of the latest technologies.

Africa has a number of singular features that have carried over into an original development model. First, the weak purchasing power in most countries has driven the rise of a low-cost market, both for services and mobile handsets, primarily with a prepaid model. The transition to data services could follow the same path, dominated by low-end plans billed based on data volume. Further down the road, Africa’s growing middle class will make it possible to move beyond the low-cost approach and foster the development of value-added products.

The region has also managed to capitalise on the latest technologies, leapfrogging over several stages of development, starting with the use of wireless technologies for accessing the Web. The continent should also benefit eventually from upcoming innovations such as constellations (drones, balloons, micro–satellites) to bring access to rural areas. Lastly, Africa has been a seedbed of innovations in services, in the financial arena (e.g. the well-known success of e-money), health, farming and education. Also noteworthy is the development of entertainment services, with well established film and TV production hubs and the more recent video game hubs.

Africa’s digital industry is expanding, with the creation of technology hubs, incubators for start-ups, regional trade and collaboration networks, bolstered by the support of local governments and global digital industry leaders.

growth_rate_services_and_telecom_market_growth_africa_middle_east_digitalafrica_dp

DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

World Telecom Services Market: Trends & Analyses, July to December 2015 – Jan. 2016
World LTE market & MBB spectrum: Markets at June 2015 & Forecasts to 2019
World FTTx market: Markets at December 2015 & Forecasts to 2020 – Jul. 2016
Telco investment challenges: CapEx dynamics – Dec. 2015

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15Nov/160

Blockchain & Financial market transformation: The challenges and opportunities of FinTech for the financial industry

copigneaux_bertrand

Bertrand Copigneaux
Senior Consultant, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Banking has long represented a big market for IT and digital technologies. It is probably one of the sectors that has invested the most in information technologies over time, for retail banking activities, and more recently for risk control systems to ensure compliance with banking and finance regulations.

More recently, however, digital innovation in this sector has been overtaken by the explosion of FinTech. Hundreds of start-ups have demonstrated the potential to innovate and transform the banking and finance as we know it. In light of recent events, several areas of innovation have emerged from the development of FinTech, either in competition or partnership with veteran banking industry players.

Every corner of the financial sector is affected, from payment solutions, to credit and lending activities faced with crowdsourced alternatives, the use of blockchains and cryptocurrency-based solutions, to the emergence of high frequency trading, big data analysis solutions and AI roboadvisors.

These technologies are disrupting the finance ecosystem, and paving the way for new players, and new business models. They also open up opportunities for the industry to transform itself and become more efficient and profitable.

decentralised_application_business_models_using_blockchain_fintech_bc

 

DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

Blockchain, Oct. 2016
Mobile Payment: The state of the industry, amid new stakes, Apr. 2016

 

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15Nov/160

Ultra-Fast Broadband Public Policies Does any one country provide a model of reference?

attali_moreno

Pierre-Michel Attali & Nicolas Moreno, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Europe 2020, the key document in Europe’s growth strategy for the coming years, published by the EuropeanCommission in May 2010, unveiled the objectives of the Digital Agenda for Europe (DAE).

 

One of the main questions concerns the efficiency of the different national plans (technological approach, funding, regulation…) which have been designed to achieve the objectives of the DAE.

National programme objectives in sync with the Digital Agenda for Europe

With the exception of France, whose coverage objectives are two years behind Europe’s, and Sweden which does not have specific time-related targets, many national plans are in line with DAE coverage objectives. Most European countries have also set additional targets, in most cases to achieve more ambitious UFB objectives, either in terms of connection speeds (France, Italy) or time frame (Germany, Sweden).

Currently disparate landscape

The disparate coverage levels in European countries cannot be attributed to any single factor, but rather to a combination of demographics, technological choices and the strength of private investment. Each European country has established a public policy (objectives, technologies) based on its own situation and features. These national plans are vital but in themselves not enough to achieve complete superfast coverage, or nationwide ultrafast 100 Mbps coverage down the road.

european_superfast_ultrafast_rankings_pma_nm_futurenetworksforum

 

DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

World FTTx market: Markets at December 2015 & Forecasts to 2020,July 2016
Digital Agenda Europe, Europe (EU-28) at the end of 2015, July 2016
Public policies for UFB, Benchmarking 7 countries in relation to the Digital Agenda for Europe, June 2016
Telco investment challenges, CapEX dynamics, Dec. 2015

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26Oct/160

Internet of Things markets The promises of a very fragmented market

ROPERT_Samuel

Samuel Ropert
Lead IoT Expert , IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

Although the Internet of Things is a powerful concept, it is not necessarily a market in and of itself. IoT encompasses a very disparate array of fields that need to be examined separately, to obtain an accurate understanding of their particular features, and their true growth potential. 

 

More operationally, beyond cost savings opportunities (mainly through various internal optimisations), with more and more connected objects, new services will emerge – chiefly through the connectivity itself (remote control applications), but also via the data generated by the machines. Leading industrial heavyweights already have their own data-oriented department.

On the industrial side, two approaches can be distinguished: traditional machine-to-machine and the ‘industrial internet’: the latter referring to an interconnected ecosystem and the former to a more siloed approach. In the main, the creation of value in the industrial Internet lies in data collection and analysis. The main question then for market players is how to collect data and analyse them, to then generate revenue. The bulk of M2M revenue should come from software and IT integration as primary applications, with the aim of enabling massive savings within verticals. Consequently, all providers are working on delivering an end-to-end solution with a strong service bent – even if this might require acquisitions for some verticals.

Applied to the consumer world, the Internet of Things (IoT) refers to smart home and connected objects in general, relatively new markets that are starting to take off. Even if questions are being raised over the sustainability of their adoption. The main reason is the lack of services attached to these objects, apart from remote use, through a mobile app. Many applications would be based on data generated by those things. However, unlike the industrial market, data privacy is a major concern here as it involves consumers’ approval. The blurred lines around privacy regulation have made all of the ecosystem’s players reluctant to provide consumer market solutions. Another hurdle is to determine what value-added comes from connecting these objects, and how to monetise the data they generate: will all objects be connected? Will all data be valuable? If so, how valuable?

 

DELVE DEEPER WITH THE FOLLOWING IDATE DIGIWORLD MARKET REPORTS

 • M2M: a new momentum, Automotive, Consumer Electronics & Utilities the main drivers for consisting growth, Dec. 2015

Smart Home, A promising market, taking off slowly, Dec. 2015

Telcos’ Connected Objects Strategies, How to compete with OTT players, Apr.2016

Industrial Internet, Towards the 4th industrial revolution, June 2016

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18Oct/160

Total SDN and NFV market valued at 19 billion EUR in 2020

RAMAHANDRY_Tiana

Tiana Ramahandry
Senior Consultant, IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

 

A mini share of the global telecom and IT equipment market, but a maximum impact on the networks’ capabilities

 

72 telco SDN/NFV projects benchmarked

The latest IDATE report – “State of the SDN/NFV market” – spotlights the main pioneering players in terms of SDN/NFV implementation, and what they are doing today. The report provides a separate dataset with 72 detailed project fact sheets as of August 2016, as well as an analysis of major stakeholders – telcos and vendors – and their strategies to evolve and transform their networks to a software-based infrastructure.

“These projects are at different stages, ranging from trial to deployment, but a few (36%) have achieved a commercial launch. Whatever their level of development, most of these projects are taking place in developed countries: Europe, the US, Japan, South Korea and China,” says Tiana Ramahandry, the report’s project leader.

SDN/NFV projects per status

schema_sdn-nfv

Source: IDATE DigiWorld, State of SDN/NFV and network investments, September 2016

Telcos’ adoption of SDN and NFV over the long term

IDATE DigiWorld analysts provide SDN/NFV market sizing data, with coming investment forecasts up to 2020. Even this market, which is expected to reach almost 19 billion EUR by 2020, remains very marginal compared to the telecom and IT equipment market, which itself is estimated at over 300 billion EUR, transformation potential in network management will be huge, as will telcos’ opportunities to adopt new services and innovative business models.

While a modest part of the global SDN and NFV market will be captured by telcos in 2020, NFV is being implemented more and more with the growing number of cloud and SDN solutions being introduced for new business services. Telcos’ large-scale deployments are expected to begin in 2016, and their CAGR over the next five years is projected to stand at 47%.

Indeed, the vast majority of the market will come from enterprises and cloud service providers that were the first to adopt SDN for use in datacentres, for both internal operations and connections with other datacentres.

Discover the perspectives,  key trends, and scenarios about "SDN & NFV market" and contact Tiana Ramahandry for further information.
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28Sep/160

DigiWorld Summit: The Digital Trust Economy

Logo-DWS2016_WEB400x150

Debate over the crucial role that trust will play in the digital economy’s future

 

The 38th annual DigiWorld Summit will run from 15 – 17 November 2016, and have as its central theme: The Internet of Trust. It will be an opportunity to engage in a meaningful international debate over digital trust issues – starting with security and privacy – which have become major sources of concern for all of the ecosystem’s stakeholders.

As the number of reported cyber-attacks worldwide is growing by close to 40% a year, we expect that upcoming stages in digital technologies’ evolution will only amplify the phenomenon. And this to such an extent that any future scenario is possible: from a continuation of the current chaos to a breakdown in trust that would lead to the construction of a new digital economy, which will no doubt differ in many respects from the one we know today.=

Are we reaching a tolerance threshold for online trust?
How can veteran digital industry players (equipment suppliers, telcos, IT companies) capitalise on the current climate?
Are verticals threatened by the situation or, on the contrary, on the winning side of trust and security issues?
Do we need a new regulatory framework to govern, or reassure, market players and consumers?

> Including the 120 speakers on this edition:
•    Eva BERNEKE, CEO, KMD
•    Anne BOUVEROT, CEO, Morpho
•    Isabelle FALQUE-PIERROTIN, Chairwoman, CNIL
•    Pierre, CHAPPAZ, Co-founder & Executive Chairman, Teads
•    Didier LAMOUCHE, President & CEO, Oberthur
•    Joseph LUBIN, Founder & CEO, ConsenSys, Co-Founder Ethereum
•    Carlos LOPEZ BLANCO, Global Head, Public and Regulatory Affairs, Telefónica
•    Stéphane RICHARD, Chairman & CEO, Orange
•    Corrado SCIOLLA, President Europe, BT Global Services
•    Nicolas SEKKAKI, CEO France, IBM

Choosing the theme for the 2016 DigiWorld Summit came about quite naturally. The vast majority of IDATE DigiWorld were eager to tackle the topic of trust.
For some time now, trust has been recognised as a vital ingredient in the success of a brand, an economy or a society. This is all the more true in a world being transformed by digital innovation. In its scenarios for 2025, IDATE DigiWorld underscored that trust was one of the key variables in tomorrow’s digital ecosystem. To shore up this belief, we need only look at some recent headlines:

•    the cyberattacks against telcos, TV networks and government agencies,
•    the legal wrangles between Apple and WhatsApp and government authorities wanting access to the encryption key for the devices or messages;
    the very drawn out European Union negotiations over new data protection rules;
•     the end of the Safe Harbor transatlantic agreement and ensuing debates over the new Privacy Shield;
    questions over the dangers surrounding connected/driverless cars, and the growing ubiquity of the IoT in general;
    the ad–blocking phenomenon;
    questions over what impact multiple FinTech solutions will have on the soundness of the banking system, and blockchain’s ability to replace today’s trusted third parties;
So trust is a focal point for telcos, cloud computing companies, Internet giants, start–ups, governments and regulators, but also for every economic sector across the board, not to mention consumers and citizens.
And, as always, acknowledging risk must not prevent us from also analysing opportunities, in terms of innovation, differentiation strategies and the competitive advantages available to many market players.

Once again this year, the vital meeting place that this international conference has become, will include plenary sessions that will provide a springboard for a series of high–level specialty forums.  These forums are an opportunity to delve deeper into the main trends we expect to see in mobile networks with the advent of 5G, ultrafast broadband, the Internet of Things, the TV market’s transformation in Europe, FinTech, video games, the digital promise in Africa and what makes a smart city.

A unique international forum for debate and networking

> DigiWorld Week
A week devoted to understanding what makes our new digital world tick (12 – 20 November 2016)
> The DigiWorld Awards
Recognising the best digital start-ups created by French entrepreneurs abroad

Key facts & figures

Europe’s trailblazing conference on the digital economy

The DigiWorld Summit is an annual event organised and hosted by IDATE experts, with the support of DigiWorld Institute members. Every year it holds ultra high-level international debates on the core issues shaping the digital economy, with the finest speakers and industry insiders.

Participants: 1,200 participants at the DigiWorld Summit and more than 5,000 at DigiWorld Week
Speakers: 120 speakers from around the world; 400 at DigiWorld Week
Partners and sponsors: over 100 partners and sponsors (businesses, public sector, media…)
Social media: 15,000 tweets (trending topics) and 2,000 live followers

For more information, visit our website: www.digiworldsummit.com

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19Jul/160

Mobile payment: M-commerce market revenue will likely grow from 2015 to 2019 at a CAGR of 26.5%

Hao_Yi

Hao Yi Emerging technologies expert, IDATE DigiWorld

The development of the mobile payment market was still heterogeneous in 2015.

 

 

The m-commerce payment market grew steadily, whereas the in-store mobile payment market remained nascent given the transaction volume, although the release of Apple Pay one year earlier had seemingly put an end to the doubts about near field communication (NFC) being the right technology for in-store proximity payment.

MCommerce_revenues_annual_growth_rate_eCommerce_v2

IDATE DigiWorld estimates that the worldwide m-commerce market revenue will likely grow from 2015 to 2019 at a CAGR of 26.5%, growing its share 26% of the overall value of the e-commerce market to 44.2%. As regards the arrival of in-store mobile payments with NFC technology, QR code, mobile wallets, mobile point-of-sale (mPOS) solutions and other mobile payment methods, IDATE DigiWorld values their transaction volume to grow at a CAGR of 74% between 2015 and 2019. The volume of in-store mobile payments is tiny compared to the trillions of USD of all point-of-sale (POS) transactions.

On the in-store payment market, no one has really ‘wined out’ as yet, although Internet giants (Apple, Google and Samsung) as well as card networks (Visa and MasterCard) are very active, and numerous new entrants are flooding in.

In addition, NFC payment working with mobile wallets did not see the expected explosion in volume. Even though the technology and NFC-enabled POS terminals have been progressively in place for many years, the perceived value of such services is low for consumers.

From the perspective of merchants, mobile payment alone is not enough to bring about mass adoption.

Find out more about this market in our dedicated report

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27Jun/160

Industrial Internet: towards the 4th industrial revolution

ROPERT_Samuel

Samuel Ropert
Lead IoT expert at IDATE DigiWorld
Contact

We can already observe the integration of IoT technologies in industry assets – which is commonly called smart factory – and emerging use cases, reducing costs and increasing productivity strikingly.

In our latest study we propose an analysis of the heterogeneous industrial landscape on three major axes: Infrastructure (Industry assets), Offering (innovative products accompanied by related services) and Relation with customers.

Industrial Internet is gaining momentum, but still needs several years for larger adoption and especially for an establishment of common standards – today several technologies and concepts coexist and only the fittest will survive when market maturity is reached.

The industrial infrastructure of industrial assets will be optimised through the development of the smart factory concept by implementing new manufacturing practices that take advantage of ICT innovations. This aims to go beyond the introduction of new technologies in the production process. The core principle is the increase in connections and integration of the different ICT-enabled components in a single networked system. The developments of the smart factory result in gains in production costs as defects are eliminated and automation reduces the intensity of human resources in production tasks. Value thus shifts to research and development and design tasks on the one hand, and to after-sales services on the other hand. These shifts impact players, enabling the development of smaller-scale units focusing on the design and engineering of products on the one hand, and the emergence of platforms and ecosystems on the other. Adoption is still limited as we are but in the early years of the smart factory. Major industries now adopting the smart factory encompass aeronautics, automotive and consumer electronics. Energy and transportation are also deploying IoT solutions along their distribution network architecture.

The Industrial Internet (IIoT) is also considered as a way to improve the appeal of core products by providing more services associated with machines rather than expecting new revenues. As a consequence, vertical players are tending to lower their expectations for data monetisation, focusing essentially on using data for process optimisation mainly, bringing more value to their core products. This is even more true for very expensive machines (aircraft, heavy equipment). However, some industries like automotive still aim to generate additional recurring service-based revenues over time through additional interactions (rather than standalone product sales with renewal several years later). They are pushing their subscription-based services, even though the real adoption is still under interrogation (even for premium manufacturers).

In addition, servicisation is also used to increase customer loyalty, where the traditional product purchase (transaction relationship) is being transformed into a recurrent relationship between suppliers and clients. Moreover, new innovative and disruptive pricing models will be introduced, with the example of tyre manufacturers which sell services (on a per-km basis through Tyre-As-A-Service) for professional fleet managers.

Data will play an important and central role in the future as many players aim to leverage the data collected from the connected objects, chiefly for business reasons. There are still questions around the real monetisation of the data as it is based on the ownership of the data itself and its related control. Early initiatives show data use for internal use, circumventing data privacy issues. To build data-managing platforms, the biggest industry players are tending to develop their own digital solutions. For smaller players, data will likely be exploited by third parties, as they lack the appropriate technical expertise and capacity to combine with other data.

The market of the Industrial Internet will be driven by the enabling technologies (LPWA and big data chiefly) which provide disruptive features. Moreover, different national and international initiatives such as Industry 4.0 or the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) support the development of these new technologies led by the automation and engineering industry giants.

schema_Industrial_internet

However, in addition to doubts around data monetisation, the market is also facing such barriers as security and reliability concerns, interoperability issues and potential societal impact on workforce training and employment. Furthermore, this is leading industrial giants to have their own data-oriented department and they are required to acquire new skills and expertise around data – a process which also takes time.

 

Get more insights on infrastructure, products and services, customer relationship related to Industrial Internet as well as an analysis of the value chain, possible monetization of data and general drivers and hurdles.

Contact Samuel Ropert

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