26Sep/13Off

In-Flight Connectivity: Satellite vs LTE

Maxime Baudry, Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE

 

Maxime Baudry
Co-Head of Satellite Practice

 

43% of worldwide commercial aircrafts will be connected for broadband access services in 2017 against only 17.5% at end-2012

Until quite recently, the aviation communications market was limited to operational communications between the cockpit and control tower. It is now expanding to include voice and data communications for passengers around the world, a market that, while still limited, is set to grow in the next few years. The technology has been around for a number of years, but Boeing’s CBB service failed to convince airlines back in 2004. As airlines compete fiercely among themselves and with other modes of transport, the benefits of passengers being able to use their cell phones or go online via their laptops or tablets could prove a very strong selling point.

The in-flight connectivity market is rapidly expanding around the world

  • The market for broadband access on planes will continue to grow in response to strong demand from air passengers for connectivity.
  • Expectations run very high: air passengers are seeking the same quality service and experience they have grown accustomed to with terrestrial connections.
  • Applications are still mainly focused on internet browsing and emails, but video consumption increases rapidly
  • To meet these expectations, one by one, airlines are equipping their fleets with broadband Internet access. By mid-2013, over a third of domestic flights (38%) in the United States offered an Internet access solution.
  • We now see a sharp increase in the number of equipped planes in all geographical regions of the globe, although virtually all of the systems currently in operation are in North America.
Evolution of "connected" aircrafts between 2010 and 2012

inflight connectivity lte vs satellite

Source: IDATE, Market Insight "Inflight conenctivity: Satellite vs LTE", August 2013

The business model remains uncertain

  • Revenue-sharing is the most common business model today. A price is agreed between the operator and airline and the revenues then shared, the operator usually taking a larger cut than the airline;
  • According to IDATE, the revenues from these services are not sufficient to generate a profit. They essentially cover just the operating costs (purchase of bandwidth, system maintenance and extra fuel consumption due to the weight of the terminal and increased drag on the plane);
  • In the future, these services could not be extra-charged
  • According to IDATE, there are still doubts regarding a sustainable business model, especially because the still weak adoption rate for paid-services (approximately 7%)

Satellite access solutions should face competition from LTE by 2016

  • Two solutions currently exist: an Air-To-Ground (ATG) solution in the United States, which is losing pace due to the lack of adequate spectrum, and the satellite solution (Ku and Ka frequency bands).
  • The introduction of Ka-band systems should revolutionize the market, providing access to much faster speeds (from 2 to 12 Mbps per passenger) at much lower prices (bandwidth costs up to 10 times cheaper).
  • By 2016, however, satellite will face competition from LTE, a technology currently being tested by manufacturers such as Alcatel-Lucent, ZTE and Huawei for in-flight connectivity on commercial aircraft.
  • LTE solutions could reach speeds of 30 Mbps per plane, with much lower CAPEX and OPEX.

IDATE estimates that 43% of aircraft will be connected in 2017

  • According to our estimates, at end-2012, more than 2 700 commercial aircraft worldwide offered a broadband Internet service, 80% of these via the Gogo terrestrial solution.
    This figure represents just 17% of the total fleet of planes worldwide, which Airbus estimates at 15 500 aircraft.
  • According to IDATE, the market for broadband Internet access on planes should expand sharply between now and 2017, reaching 8 240 aircraft in 2017 (43% of the total fleet in service worldwide).
  • Market is facing a complete hybridization of ATG LTE & Satellite services up to 2020.

IDATE's new insight "In-Flight Connectivity" provides its readers with a synoptic overview of the latest changes in the In-Flight Broadband market. It showcases the market's current services and usages, analyzes the various business models, details the existing satellite solutions and proposes a prospective for 2017, taking in account the emerging Air-To-Ground solutions based on LTE technology.

27Aug/13Off

Satellite Growth Engines

Maxime Baudry, Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE
Maxime Baudry
Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE

Satellite faces a host of challenges

The shift in video viewing to more on-demand consumption, the massive reduction in the cost of terrestrial bandwidth and the explosion of spectrum-hungry terrestrial mobile broadband services are some of the challenges facing players in the satellite industry. If satellite is to hold its ground it must position itself effectively with respect to terrestrial, because in IDATE’s view, the technology is often more geared to competition rather than co-opetition. We have selected a number of important markets that illustrate these challenges and satellite’s current market positioning.

  • The global market for satellite broadcasting (DTH) doubled in size between 2005 and 2011, reaching USD 84.4 billion in 2011, i.e. 78% of the total revenue generated by satellite services. Satellite’s share of the TV distribution market (both free and pay-TV channels) was around 25% with steady growth. The television market has seen many changes in consumption patterns as well as service offerings and distribution solutions, and these are likely to cast doubt on the business models of traditional market players. Unlike cable, which is losing ground to IPTV, satellite will continue to grow to 2017 and expand its market shares.
Weight of satellite around the world (% of TV homes & % of pay-TV homes)

Source: IDATE, "Satellite – Outlook for some key markets", June 2013
  • The two-way access market is also an important growth hub for satellite, although performance does vary from one geographical region to another. Our forecasts show that North America will remain the dominant market, sustained by very competitive solutions and still limited network coverage in some remote areas of the territory. The European market is taking off, mainly due to dynamic performance in certain countries, led by France. However, telcos are starting to deploy LTE-based residential solutions in these markets which are often more competitive than satellite (particularly the equipment, which is cheaper and installed for free).
  • Some niche markets are also growth outlets, although overall they account for less than 10% of the satellite capacity used. The main niche market is satellite M2M for use at sea or in remote terrestrial locations. While still a growth market, it faces increasing competition from terrestrial mobile networks (M2M cards with 3G, and LTE in a few months time)..
Positioning of main operators for satellite M2M

Source: IDATE, "Satellite – Outlook for some key markets", June 2013
  • The Earth observation market recently became an important growth engine for the satellite industry, driven by two very different types of customer. Around 80% of the demand for images comes from the military, mainly to gather information in areas of conflict (surveillance of nuclear proliferation facilities, terrorist camps, etc.). The other important segment is sustained by the geolocalised imagery market where customers purchase large quantities of high-resolution images for online mapping portals, such as Google Maps and Microsoft Virtual Earth. However, demand does seem to be slipping slightly as images are refreshed less frequently.

This analysis is an extract from our Satellite: outlook for some key markets Market Insight which we propose within our ongoing monitoring of Satellite market.

Filed under: Satellite Comments Off
10Jun/13Off

The state of the digital world in figures

Interview with Didier Pouillot, Digiworld Yearbook project manager

Interview published in weekly letter from ARCEP - 7 June 2013

Find the intervew Didier Pouillot by ARCEP on the occasion of the publication of the 13th of the DigiWorld Yearbook: our annual publication on the state of the digital world. (Interview available in french only)

Source: ARCEP's website

Didier Pouillot reviews the status and trends of DigiWorld markets: telecommunications, computer and television, an economy that accounts for 6% of global GDP, but whose performance is currently short of those of the general economy, particularly in Europe, on which Didier Pouillot explains the situation. This is also an opportunity to recall the issues in each market of the digital economy with many business models are changing mainly because of internet giants: Facebook, Amazon, Google, Microsoft and Apple, and more broadly OTT services.

Discover the slides from the London Yearbook presentation with Ronan Dune, CEO Telefónica :

Digiworld Yearbook 2013 Presentation in London, with Ronan Dunne, CEO Telefónica UK Limited. from DigiWorld by IDATE

About the Digiworld Yearbook

digiworld yearbook 2013
197 pages that deliver the finest market insights from IDATE experts who track the changes at work in the globe’s telecom, Internet and media industries throughout the year.

the DigiWorld Yearbook is published in English and French and available in print and PDF format. An iPad edition, developed by Forecomm, is also available.

The 2012 edition can be downloaded for free
The 2013 edition is available for purchase. Print: €99.99, incl. VAT; PDF and iPad: €54.99, incl. VAT

 

  • You can have a look at the digiworld yearbook 2013, purchase it or even download the 2012 version for free at : www.digiworld.org/yearbook/
30May/13Off

Scorecard for the digital economy in 2012

Digiworld Yearbook 2013 : scorecard for the digital economy in 2012

DigiWorld markets took a hit in 2012, with growth dropping to 2.7% after two years on the road to recovery.

DigiWorld markets took a hit in 2012, with growth dropping to 2.7% after two years on the road to recovery. Meanwhile new online, or over-the-top (OTT), services continue to grow by around 20% on average—although, in terms of revenue, they are still outweighed by veteran solutions by more than 20 to 1.

Digiworld Market figures and forecasts 2010 to 2016

Hardware markets have been the hardest hit, with growth dropping by 2.4 points overall in telecom, IT and consumer electronics (CE) markets combined. The first two are still in the black, thanks in large part to rising smartphone sales on the telecom front, and strong tablet sales on the IT front. CE hardware (audio and video equipment) is in bad shape, however. Television sales, which are naturally one of the market’s mainstays, are struggling to find a boost comparable to the one delivered by the introduction of fl at screens in the 2000s.

Services, meanwhile, have fared somewhat better, with growth rates of between 2.7% for telecommunications and 4% for television, by way of 3.8% for IT and software services. These markets outperformed hardware segments in 2012 and were far more homogenous. Yet there are still huge gaps in regional performance levels across the board (see next chapter).

Hardware markets gasping for air

At the end of 2010, we saw signs of concern in certain hardware segments—despite what had appeared to be a year of recovery by and large. PC sales were down, and the industry was already wondering what new products would help keep TV sales on the up (3DTV? Connected TV?). Results for 2011 were relatively reassuring, with sales continuing to rise in both the telecom and IT markets. Only consumer electronics was suffering, although not too badly. Still, 2012 proved a blow, with sales dropping virtually across the board, and pressure on prices largely eradicating any positive infl ux from users upgrading to new devices. TV sales were the hardest hit, and propelled the 7% drop in sales for the CE sector. Increased competition in the smartphone and tablet markets have also shaken things up in the other two sectors.

Services markets still holding on

When the recession was at its height in 2009, the boast was made that ICT services in general and telecom services in particular could weather any storm: there was much talk of resilience, no doubt thinking that, as with counterpart hardware, these services were not only able to take the blows but also to rebound, and find their way back to their initial trajectory. That was then. Although there is no denying a certain relative resistance, it now seems very unlikely that we will return at any point to the growth rates of the mid-2000s, and even less to the double-digit growth of the late 1990s. Or rather, that only a slim portion of services will—thanks to the explosion of new online services. Core veteran services, on the other hand, are up against a new set of pressures from these fledgling rivals: decreased value of telecom services, of customer relations for IT services, and of programming for TV networks.

About the Digiworld Yearbook

digiworld yearbook 2013
197 pages that deliver the finest market insights from IDATE experts who track the changes at work in the globe’s telecom, Internet and media industries throughout the year.

the DigiWorld Yearbook is published in English and French and available in print and PDF format. An iPad edition, developed by Forecomm, is also available.

The 2012 edition can be downloaded for free
The 2013 edition is available for purchase. Print: €99.99, incl. VAT; PDF and iPad: €54.99, incl. VAT

 

  • You can have a look at the digiworld yearbook 2013, purchase it or even download the 2012 version for free at : www.digiworld.org/yearbook/
15Apr/13Off

Residential LTE vs. Satellite broadband

Maxime Baudry, Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE

Maxime Baudry
Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE

Perspectives for satellite broadband facing residential LTE offerings

Just as they did with 3G, telcos started to propose residential offers based on LTE, how does it compare with satellite broadband offers?

Residential LTE, a direct competitor to satellite broadband

ust as they did with 3G, telcos started to propose residential offers based on LTE. It’s notably the case of Verizon Wireless in the United States who proposes “Home Fusion” since May 2012, a service that allows households to access broadband via an outdoor LTE antenna installed on one of the walls of the building. The antenna is billed 200 USD but the installation is free. How does it compare with satellite broadband offers? Downloading speeds vary between 5 and 12 Mbps in average with a pricing range going from 60USD for 10GB of data to 120 USD Monthly for 120 GB. With similarities in pricing, downloading speeds and data caps, LTE is positioned as a direct competitor to Satellite broadband.

Residential LTE coming to Europe

In Europe, first LTE offers arrive on the market. The first to propose such services was Netcom, a filial of TeliaSonera, who was first to propose LTE in Norway. It offers 100GB of data for a monthly fee of 68 EUR. According to Netcom, it is very likely that this kind of solution could be considered as a substitute to DSL, especially when the monthly data cap exceeds observed traffic on DSL networks (An average of 30 GB per household). In germany, Vodafone proposes a similar offer since 2012, but this time it is differentiated with quality of service through network speed with prices starting from 25 EUR to 40 EUR monthly to have access to 50 Mbps and 30 GB.

Satellite Broadband: no more competitive?

Considering this kind of offers, satellite broadband is no more competitive, neither on network speed nor on monthly data cap offered. Even though these new offerings materializes the LTE threat for satellite broadband we had foreseen, LTE coverage remains very limited. Anyhow, satellite will have to pursue its downloading speeds increase since 2008 if it wants to maintain a competitive advantage on this market.

Positioning of some satellite broadband offers in France, March 2013

saterllite_broadband_france

Source: Digiworld by IDATE

Maxime Baudry
Head of the radio technologies & spectrum practice, IDATE
m.baudry@idate.org

>More information about Satellite Ultra Broadband in Europe

18Mar/13Off

Satellite Broadcast: Main trends and impacts for the industry

Maxime Baudry, Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE

Maxime Baudry
Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE

Satellite TV broadcast booming in emerging countries

Satellite TV broadcast is put in the forefront with our analysts attending the Satellite 2013 summit in Washington, USA from march 18 to 21 2013

Satellite broadcasting is currently being led by the explosive development in emerging countries. According to IDATE’s findings, there were at year-end 2012, 372 million satellite households with more than a half located in emerging countries. As an example, the Indian satellite pay-TV market registered a growth of 20 million households in only two years, to reach an estimated base of 51 million subscribers at the end of 2012.

World's current satellite TV broadcast market

Between 2008 and 2011, close to 100 million households worldwide switched over to satellite TV, which is almost identical to how many viewers terrestrial TV lost during that time. To compare, cable TV gained 55.5 million households and IPTV 26.4 million during that period.

Breakdown of the globe’s TV households by access technology

Globe's TV households by access technology

Source: IDATE, World TV Markets, August 2012

Satellite TV is booming in emerging countries

Satellite broadcasting is currently being led by the explosive development in emerging countries. According to IDATE’s findings, there were at year-end 2012, 372 million satellite households with more than a half located in emerging countries. As an example, the Indian satellite pay-TV market registered a growth of 20 million households in only two years, to reach an estimated base of 51 million subscribers at the end of 2012.

Impacts of TV broadcasting for the satellite industry

These developments have great impact on satellite capacity, as it is estimated that emerging countries roughly accounted for 90% of the new satellite capacity leased in 2012. According to SES, the weight of emerging countries in the total demand of satellite capacity worldwide will move from 69% in 2012 to 76% in 2019. Whereas the Western Europe and North American markets are expected to register a CAGR of -0.3% and -0.5% respectively, the Latin American market will for instance grow at a CAGR of 6.3% and the Eastern European one at +3.3%.

Maxime Baudry
Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE
m.baudry@idate.org

More information on Satellite Broadcast in our TV observatory

13Mar/13Off

Satellite broadband : main market trends to 2020

Maxime Baudry, Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATEMaxime Baudry
Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE

State of the art of satellite broadband

The scope is put on the satellite ultra broadband with our analysts attending the upcoming Satellite 2013 summit in Washington, USA.

Three to five times more expensive than ADSL offers in the early 2000s, broadband satellite services have long required a sizeable investment from rural residential users interested in this type of access, with some even preferring to opt for “unlimited PSTN”. Prices have come down since then and, even though satellite access is still more expensive than ADSL, the gap has shrunk substantially. At year-end 2012, there were 1.2 million subscribers in North America, 200 000 in Asia Pacific (IPStar service), and roughly 150 000 in Europe.

Drop in the price of broadband satellite terminals

Parallel to the decrease in the price of subscriptions, the price of satellite terminals has also dropped, thanks to technical improvements which have helped bring down production costs, and to the economies of scale generated by the tens of thousands of terminals sold by manufacturers. Current prices vary between 250 and 350 EUR and could drop to 200 EUR by 2015.

Evolution of broadband satellite reception terminal prices (EUR)

Broadband satellite reception terminal price has gone from more than 2000 EUR in 2003 to 250 and 350 EUR currently and could drop to 200 EUR by 2015
Source: Digiworld by IDATE

Industry preparing for ultra-fast broadband via satellite

As part of its ARTES programme, the ESA (European Space Agency) has plans to develop a very high-speed satellite called the Terabit/s Satellite. Based on a very broad platform, the Terabit/s spacecraft will make it possible to achieve speeds of around 200 Mbps with dishes measuring 40 cm in diameter, through the use of the Q and V frequency bands.
French space agency CNES also has similar plans. The THDSat project is currently in R&D phase and could supply French households and SMEs with access at 20-100 Mbps starting in 2016. The THDSat initiative would involve satellite constructors EADS Astrium and Thales Alenia Space, and possibly service provider Eutelsat, among others.

Impacts for satellite broadband

Satellite is clearly a viable alternative technology for reducing all t ypes of digital divide. Its development is nevertheless being stunted by the steady progress being made in terrestrial technologies and the need to increase data rates.
Although latest satellites allow access speeds of up to 20 Mbps, they are behind their earthbound rivals as the data rates supplied by FTTx or LTE are closer to 50-100 Mbps. It is only by being able to rival its terrestrial counterparts that satellite can become a credible alternative, which is why projects like the THDSat and the Terabit/s Satellite are now on the table.

Maxime Baudry
Co-Head of Satellite Practice at IDATE
m.baudry@idate.org

More information on Satellite Ultra-Broadband Markets

29Oct/12Off

Satellite Ultra-Broadband

Maxime BAUDRY

Head of Satellite Practice at DigiWorld IDATE
 
 
 

Africa, a new growth opportunity?

 
IDATE has just published its study “Satellite Ultra-Broadband in Europe & Africa” which explores the latest developments in broadband and ultra-fast broadband markets in Europe and Africa. After a detailed examination of the dynamics of these areas, in both fixed and mobile markets, the report delivers strategic and figure-backed responses to the question of the current and future role of satellite in the race to deploy broadband and ultra-fast broadband. The report comes with its own database including the set of indicators analyzed for all the areas studied.

Maxime Baudry, project manager of this study and co-header of the satellite practice at DigiWorld IDATE, shares his point of view about the actual situation of the Satellite Ultra-Broadband:

“Satellite technology has made enormous progress in recent years, boosting the average downlink speed from 3 Mbps in 2008 to 10-18 Mbps in 2012, and raising traffic caps from 2 GB to 10-20 GB (in some cases even unlimited). It thus seems set to even tackle DSL gray zones, which only a few years ago seemed inaccessible.”

He adds: “On the ultra-fast broadband front, however, satellite is lagging behind: while large-scale rollouts of FTTx and LTE, and even LTE-Advanced between 2012 and 2020 will offer observed download speeds of 30-70 Mbps (and even 200-300 Mbps with LTE-Advanced), the most advanced satellite developments make it possible to supply “only” 50 Mbps, and even then not before 2015 at the earliest. To be able to offer such speeds, satellite technology may well switch to frequency bands even higher than the Ka band.”

Africa, a new growth opportunity?

  • Africa’s fixed broadband market is still extremely limited, with an average density of 3.4% of households in the region at end-2011.
  • With limited fixed infrastructures, operators are focusing all their efforts on mobile broadband, often only deployed in the most profitable urban areas.
  • Over the past three years, however, the region has seen major rollouts of underwater cables, boosting subscriber speeds. Africa’s capacity at end-2011 is estimated at 22 Tbps versus 4 Tbps at end-2009.
  • Satellite ultra-broadband remains a tough market in most countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, where barriers to entry remain very high, such as low ARPUs, poor literacy rates (30% to 40% of the population), low electrification (10% of the rural population) and low PC penetration (often below 5% of households)
  • Extremely high equipment prices caused by high customs barriers remain a major handicap.
  • Against this backdrop, only a few countries seem to present any real short-term potential: South Africa, Kenya, Nigeria and countries in North Africa.

Promising market outlooks

IDATE estimates that between 2012 and 2016 the number of satellite broadband subscribers in Europe will increase by 29% annually.

Africa will post the sharpest growth, a region where the telecoms infrastructure is much more restricted than in Europe. We estimate that the launch of solutions costing 20-30 EUR a month in Africa, such as YahClick and IP Easy, are likely to attract a tier-one clientele with incomes well above the majority of the population, eager to acquire a fixed broadband access solution that is superior to traditional landline connection and often at a cheaper price (excluding the expensive equipment cost which, at around 600 EUR, is inflated by customs barriers). However, areas of uncertainty remain in this market, especially over the future technical and economic performance of fixed infrastructures after the deployment of numerous underwater cable and terrestrial backbone projects funded by the World Bank.

Eastern Europe, the market that seemed to offer most potential at the outset, has failed to take off, with subscriber bases remaining very limited. Several reasons explain this failure: it is a tough market with extremely low ARPUs, making it hard for satellite services operators to make sufficient profits. Also, most countries have invested in mobile infrastructures (LTE already deployed in many countries, including Hungary, Lithuania and Poland), sidelining satellite. Lastly, operator distribution networks revolve around small business operations, while in Western Europe they usually rely on major operators such as Orange, SFR, Swisscom and Deutsche Telekom.

Western Europe has not seen very high growth either. Two countries, France and Germany, continue to make up most of the subscriber base, while operators have managed to boost subscriber numbers quickly via government programs to reduce the digital divide, such as Avanti in Scotland and Eutelsat in Italy. The German market though does now seem to be losing subscribers to other technologies, particularly LTE deployed in rural parts of the country.

Maxime BAUDRY
Project manager
m.baudry@idate.org

Visit our website for more information on this topic

 

17Oct/12Off

DigiWorld Summit 2012

Christine BARRE

Christine BARRE

Responsable DigiWorld Summit, DigiWorld by IDATE

 
 

A l’approche du DigiWorld Summit 2012, l’IDATE livre son analyse de la situation de l'économie numérique européenne

 
A l’occasion d’une conférence de presse organisée à Paris ce jour, le DigiWorld Institute by IDATE a livré son analyse de l’avenir de l’Europe des Télécoms et de la Télévision.

Quelques mois après la publication du DigiWorld Yearbook et quelques semaines avant le DigiWorld Summit, le DigiWorld Institute by IDATE, Institut spécialisé dans le domaine des télécommunications, médias et Internet, livre son analyse de la situation de l'économie numérique européenne à travers la situation exemplaire des secteurs des télécommunications et de l'audiovisuel. Cette conférence a également été l’occasion de présenter le programme du prochain DigiWorld Summit. Alors que la dernière édition du DigiWorld Yearbook avait été l'occasion d'attirer l'attention sur l'accentuation des faiblesses de la zone, le DigiWorld Institute by IDATE revient sur les grands enjeux auxquels l'Europe de la télévision et des télécommunications doit faire face.

Télécoms et Télévision européenne : Le point de basculement ?

Côté Télécoms, Yves Gassot, Directeur Général de l’IDATE, affirme : « Après avoir globalement réussi l'introduction d'une concurrence effective favorable au consommateur et dans une certaine mesure à l'innovation, l'Europe doit prendre en compte la situation inquiétante du secteur ».

Cela se traduit notamment par :

  • une récession qui s'accompagne d'une pression sur les marges et l'investissement, à un moment où il faut accélérer les déploiements des réseaux fixes et mobiles à très haut débit et supporter l'explosion des trafics,
  • un contexte peu favorable pour définir de nouveaux business models, lesquels sont pourtant indispensables pour répondre aux challenges lancés par des géants de l'Internet,
  • une difficulté pour progresser vers un "single European market" tandis que s'accélère la consolidation aux Etats-Unis et que s'affirment des opérateurs de taille mondiale à partir des économies émergentes.

Côté audiovisuel, pour Gilles Fontaine, Directeur Général adjoint de l’IDATE, « ce serait une erreur de sous-estimer les points forts de l'industrie européenne ». En effet, la part de marché des chaînes de télévision et des distributeurs reste élevée alors que la production cinématographique est, dans une certaine mesure, le garant, d'une création autonome originale. Cependant, compte-tenu du poids des studios hollywoodiens, il serait illusoire de vouloir construire ex-nihilo un ou des champion(s) européen(s) des nouveaux services vidéo. La dissociation des droits « à la demande et linéaires » favorisera en effet les services nord-américains. Ce sont les raisons pour lesquelles il apparaît indispensable de favoriser une gestion des fenêtres, intégrée au sein des groupes de télévision dans un contexte où la SVOD est l’outil d’entrée des chaînes en clair sur le marché du péage.

Si les marchés de la télévision vont encore rester nationaux, une certaine internationalisation est cependant possible, voire indispensable. Pour cela, il faudra réviser le rôle respectif des chaînes et des producteurs dans la production de télévision (et non de cinéma). Par exemple, il faudrait également étudier la possibilité de lancer une chaîne jeunesse publique européenne disposant d'une base commune aux différents services publics européens.

DigiWorld Summit 2012 : Quelle place pour l'Europe au moment où l'émergence d'un nouvel ordre économique numérique mondial se met en place ?

Durant cette conférence, François Barrault, Président de l'IDATE, a présenté le programme du prochain DigiWorld Summit 2012. Ce sommet abordera le contexte mondial d'évolution des différents maillons de la chaîne du numérique avec des sessions plénières de haut niveau traitant des Smart Devices, des industries du contenu, des telcos et des plates-formes, des villes numériques,…

Le DigiWorld Summit est un rendez-vous incontournable qui permet de prendre la mesure des enjeux économiques et stratégiques pour les acteurs du secteur. Seront abordés des thèmes clés à travers une série de séminaires portant sur :

  • Les Villes numériques
  • Les contenus dans le Cloud
  • Les réseaux de nouvelle grenaison (fixe et mobile)
  • Big Data et protection des données personnelles

Le DigiWorld Summit est également l’occasion de mettre en avant le potentiel exceptionnel du territoire au cœur duquel cette conférence se tient depuis sa création :

  • Les jeux vidéo seront à l’honneur durant une journée complète de conférences et de rencontres professionnelles organisées en partenariat avec le Montpellier in Game, événement que Montpellier Agglomération propose pour la troisième année consécutive.
  • Les entreprises et start-up innovantes seront mises à avant à l’initiative de La Région Languedoc-Roussillon qui organise des rencontres B2B au travers du Networking by Sud de France Développement

DWS12
 
Le DigiWorld Summit en bref
 
 

  • Plus de 1400 participants attendus
  • Plus de 130 intervenants
  • Les présentations des analyses des consultants de l’IDATE
  • Plus de 20 nationalités représentées
  • Des sessions plénières de très haut niveau et 5 séminaires et conférences spécialisés
  • Une sélection d'une trentaine d'exposants proposant des démonstrations et présentant leurs innovations

De très nombreuses occasions de networking durant une soirée d’ouverture à l'Opéra Comédie et une soirée de gala exceptionnelle sur le site d'IBM

> Découvrez le nouveau site internet du DigiWorld Summit 2012

5Apr/12Off

Satellite M2M Market

Maxime BAUDRY

Head of Satellite Practice at DigiWorld IDATE

The global market is forecast to reach 2.3 billion EUR in 2016


IDATE just releases the first edition of its market report providing its readers with an analysis of the M2M market that is currently changing shape, assessing the key technologies to accelerate such a development of this promising market, along with an examination of the positioning of the top players, the key issues to be addressed and market forecasts up to 2015 by geographical area and by type of market.

M2M is a growing segment for the satellite industry, although satellite still has only a small share of the machine-to-machine market which is largely dominated by cellular systems: around 2% in terms of volume and 6% of revenue in 2011.
For most operators, M2M is still very much a niche market, but everything points to real growth potential for these applications.

“While it is sectors like fleet management and maritime security that have driven the sector’s development up to now, new markets have been emerging over the past several years, especially in the area of energy, but also in the homeland security/military arena.” insists Maxime BAUDRY, project manager of this study and IDATE’s head of the satellite practice.

Satellite M2M market growth/disruptive factors

There are several factors driving the growth of satellite M2M applications, starting with:

Clear assets in terms of coverage: once classic and low-cost wireless solutions (chiefly GSM and 3G) are no longer available, satellite becomes the only possible solution for M2M applications. This is especially true of vast desert areas, and of oceans where demand for M2M solutions is high: for tracking fishing vessels, dangerous cargo, monitoring offshore wind farms, etc.

Tremendous increase in applications requiring M2M. Examples here include smarts grids in the area of energy, tracking shipments – whether on land, sea or in the air – and for the military which are heavy users of M2M applications for tracking combat assets, in addition to having the means to pay for very high-end and so very expensive products.

Complementary nature of terrestrial and satellite networks to deliver M2M links end-to-end. Manufacturers have been innovating over the past several years by rolling out hybrid equipment which is being used more and more by operators. Orbcomm was a pioneer in this field, and was then followed by players such as Iridium and Inmarsat.

Stricter regulation. Recent developments in maritime regulation, notably the adoption of stricter regulations over monitoring commercial vessels, have been beneficial to satellite which is the only possible solution for this type of application outside of coastal areas.

Current satellite M2M market estimates

The satellite M2M market still represents only a small fraction of satellite services revenue. In the satellite M2M market came to 1.5 billion USD while the Satellite Industry Association (SIA) puts the entire satellite services market at an estimated 101 billion USD – giving M2M a 1.5% share of the market. IDATE estimates for 2011 indicate that this share will increase to 1.6%. The number of M2M modules in services stood at 1.3 million units in 2010.

The global satellite M2M market is forecast to reach 2.3 billion EUR in 2016. The highest rate of increase will be in the Asia-Pacific region thanks to developments in countries such as China, Indonesia, Vietnam and India.

Historical growth of satellite M2M market volume
(Millions modules)

Maxime BAUDRY
Project manager
m.baudry@idate.org

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