18Sep/140

Digiworld Summit 2014 : Mobility reloaded, we ain’t seen nothing yet!

GASSOT Yves


Yves Gassot
Directeur Général, IDATE

‘Mobility reloaded” will be the central theme of the 36th annual DigiWorld Summit.

Following through on ‘‘Game Changers’’ (2012) and ‘‘Digital Gold Mines’’ (2013), this year’s theme will allow us to further our examination of current and future upheavals in the digital economy by exploring the issues from a specific angle: mobility and its impact on user behaviour and on the value chain for telecoms, TV, advertising, the Internet, gaming, smart cities, etc.

  • What innovations can we expect from mobile Internet disruption?
  • Are fixed and mobile superfast access interchangeable?
  • What new players and business models will emerge from the Internet of Things and mobile advertising?
  • Will mobile devices turn TV into a one-to-one business?
  • How can Europe get back in the game?

IDATE Chairman François Barrault points out that, ‘If the cloud, big data and the Internet of things are clearly the major disruptions looming on the horizon, the momentum today lies in the mantra: mobility first!

IDATE CEO, Yves Gassot, details the key points of this year’s programme: ‘What began with the swift commercial success of 4G is segueing into the spectacular technological leaps expected from LTE-advanced and, beyond that, the prospect of 5G, the widespread adoption of software-driven networking (SDN)… But questions also linger over the accelerated pace of the migration from the fixed to the mobile Internet, spurred by the massive popularity of smartphones and tablets, coupled with the surge of emerging economies. It goes without saying that a great many stakeholders are being affected by these massive changes in the landscape, which we have chosen to explore from three angles: How revenue is progressing for mobile operators and other players, from M2M to the Internet of things and beyond; How the massively mobile Internet will affect the advertising ecosystem; and how TV industry players are positioning themselves now that video accounts for an increasingly large share of mobile traffic’.

The 36th annual DigiWorld Summit will run from 18 to 20 November in Montpellier, France, and play host to a panel of international industry luminaries who will share their views with more than 1,300 participants from 30 countries. IDATE analysts will lend their expertise to the sessions that will be moderated by Digiworld Institute members.

DigiworldSummit-Programm2014-600px

 

DigiWorld Week: the DigiWorld Summit broadens its horizons

This year’s DigiWorld Summit will kick off DigiWorld Week: a new initiative from IDATE and its key partners to explore the many facets of the digital society’s core economic issues. A series of exciting events will be taking place from 16 to 21 November on either side of the core two-day Summit:

  • The Connected Things Forum
  • The Game Summit
  • MIG (Montpellier In Game)
  • Industry Oracles
  • Workshops
  • Economic Club on m-payment

> Find the latest programme updates at www.digiworldweek.com

 

More than 140 speakers on hand

This year, we are delighted to welcome speakers from the four corners of the globe, come to share their views on the future of mobility:

    • Mikael BÄCK, Vice President Global Strategy & Portfolio Management of Ericsson will share some of the chief findings of the “Mobility report”.
    • Jean-Michel FOURNIER, CEO & Co-Founder of BitGym, a San Francisco-based start-up and winner of the prestigious Auggie Award at AWE 2014, will talk about the “quantified self” phenomenon.
    • Kayvan MIRZA, CEO & Co-Founder of Optinvent will unveil his approach to new generation smart glasses.
    • Patrick PELATA, EVP & Chief Automotive Officer of Salesforce.com will speak with Thierry VIADIEU, New Mobility Program Director from Renault, about the future of connected cars.
    • Christophe WILLEM, Senior VP of Strategy & Marketing at Thales Alenia Space, will tell us if drones, balloons and mini-satellites offer viable solutions for connecting huge swaths of the population to the Internet.
    • Michel COMBES, CEO of Alcatel-Lucent will close the “Road to 5G” session, whose speakers include Selina LO, President & CEO of Ruckus Wireless, and Atsushi TAKESHITA, President & CEO of DOCOMO Communication Laboratories Europe.
    • Pierre LOUETTE, Deputy CEO of Orange and Carlos LOPEZ-BLANCO, Global Head Public & Corporate Affairs for Telefonica, will discuss how telco business models will evolve in Europe, against the backdrop of market consolidation.
    • Laurent SOLLY, Facebook’s Managing Director France, and Benny ARBEL, Founder & CEO of MyThings, a rising star in retargeting, will discuss the challenges that advertising faces as it makes the transition to mobile.
    • Luc JULIA, VP & Innovation Fellow of Samsung and Co-authored Apple Siri's core patents, Erick TINICO, Director of Mobility at AT&T, one of the world’s most advanced telcos and Axel HANSMANN, Gemalto’s VP of M2M Strategy & Marketing, will share their analysis of new business models for M2M and the IoT.
    • Fu SHENG, CEO of Cheetah Mobile, a growing mobile Internet powerhouse in China, with 340 million users.
    • Abigail KHANNA, Head of Digital and Future Media Business Development at the BBC, Steve McCAFFERY, GM & SVP of sales for Europe Arris, Eric SCHERER, Director of Future Media, France Télévisions, and Valery GERFAUD, General Manager, M6 Web, will explore what the future holds for television, now that mobile devices are becoming users’ screen of choice.
    • Guillaume de FONDAUMIERE, Co-CEO of Quantic Dream, Susan O’CONNOR, a writer whose script credits include the games BioShock 1 & 2, Far Cry 2, Tomb Raider and Star Wars 1313, along with Charles CECIL, co-founder of Revolution Software, creator of Broken Sword, are among our video game Oracles.
    • Meng LI, Director of China Telecom’s Mobile Business Department Europe, will talk to us about the development outlook for mobile in its various forms in the world’s biggest market.
    • Jean-Ludovic SILICANI will talk about his time as Chairman of France’s telecoms and postal regulator, ARCEP, and share his insights into key issues going forward.
    • Vincent LE STRADIC, Managing Director of Lazard, will provide a financier’s perspective on the health of Europe’s digital economy. And…
  • Axelle LEMAIRE, French Ministry of State for Digital Affairs will deliver the Summit’s closing remarks.

See the complete list of speakers.

15Sep/140

Alain Le Diberder, Arte:”The video game industry is facing a deep shift of its main business model”

Published in COMMUNICATIONS & STRATEGIES No. 94

 

alain-lediberder-arte
Alain Le Diberder - ARTE,
Managing director 
and head of programs, Strasbourg, France

Conducted by Laurent MICHAUD, IDATE, Montpellier, France

 

 

C&S:How do you see the video game industry today?
Alain LE DIBERDER: The industry is facing a deep shift of its main business model. It’s not a problem of overall market size. Even if the macroeconomic environment is rather dull, even if the new mobile market works with very low price levels, most of the firms are able to adapt themselves to the new revenue framework. Instead the main issue is the changes needed in the corporate organizations. Yesterday, AAA products were king and the sales department was king of the AAA market. Today the whole process starting from an idea and ending in an actual consumer needs to be reshaped. Unfortunately marketing, technology and price policy are far more flexible than human behavior.

C&S:Video games are reaching their full potential online with multiplayer or massively multiplayer, social, viral, flash and ubiquitous components. What do these developments inspire for you?
A.L.D: All these technologies are impressive and improving very quickly. But I’m not sure that they actually drive the industry to a new era. Videogamers were “social” from the start, and videogames were “viral” far before Facebook or Tweeter. Even in the Eighties, schools and universities were an effective “social media” in which gamers and game reputations were debated, built and destroyed. And they still are. The new phenomenon is that the “social” dimension is now included in the code. And there are opportunities to make money with it. But the videogame industry, for the moment, is not able to catch the main part of this market, which is dominated by “transversal” companies like Facebook, Twitter, Apple and so on.

C&S:What are the effects of globalization on the creation of content, on the creators?
A.L.D:The videogame industry is probably the first entertainment business being born global. The movie industry was partly global relatively soon (say around 1910), but even today national and regional components remain important. It’s the same for music industry. The reason why the videogame industry is different is quite simple: during the first ten years of its history, there was barely no text inside the games. Remember Pong, Pacman, Space Invaders, or even the first Mario. Without any words the only text to be translated was the cartridge sleeve or the instruction sheet on the arcade cabinet. The need for text and localization only came with PC games in the eighties, but it was too late for local cultures: the industry DNA was definitively global. Even the word “localization” tells the truth. The industry can’t be more global than it was at its birth, and the only thing that could happen in the future is less globalization, not more. But it probably won’t.

C&S:Hardware vs. software: are home consoles set to disappear in favor of streamed games? More generally, won't hardware be reduced to a "stupid” screen?
A.L.D:I don’t believe that the console industry holds a strong future. Consoles are expensive, non-durable and challenged pieces of hardware. Competition from set-top boxes and mobile devices is stronger and stronger. But hardware won’t be reduced to a stupid screen. There is a bright future for hardware if you compare the specifications (and price) of a present smartphone to those of a home computer or a home console from ten years ago. Hardware is more and more smart, not stupid. In fact the new hardware standards and the telecommunication networks live together in an ecosystem in which smart networks need smart home equipments, not dumb.

C&S:Oculus Rift, Google Glass, holographic technology ... what do you think the next disruptive gaming experience will be?
A.L.D:I can’t see such a thing as a disruptive technology in the videogame history. Technology is an additive process in the videogame industry not a subtractive one. For instance when the home console began, in 1974, the arcade market didn’t disappear. The computer games started slowly at the end of the seventies and added their sales to the console market. When the PC market was mature, in the beginning of the nineties, the console market exploded too in the 16 bits era. Online games began to be popular before the web. I remember having wasted many hours playing Microprose Grand Prix on line in 1992 with a 14.4kbs modem. Today the online market is strong, but more than 20 years after, between 60 and 80% of the overall market, depending on what you consider as a videogame « sale » is still offline. We could also think of 3D games, Virtual reality helmets, streamed games and so on. But the truth is that during 40 years many technologies have been introduced, many have failed (especially with 3D, beware Oculus!) and many have contributed to the Harlequin suit in which the videogame industry is dressed.

C&S:What are the issues in which the French industry still needs to progress?
A.L.D:There are French developers, French magazines, excellent French videogame schools, some French companies, but the “French industry” doesn’t exist. Of course there is Ubi Soft. But Ubi began to develop games in Asia or Morocco 25 years ago, and regarding the workforce, is more a Canadian company than a French one. Vivendi invested in big US companies but they remained American companies reporting to French shareholders. And Vivendi sold the main part of the shares to Activision. Infogrames bought many British and American companies and the glorious brand of Atari, but it failed. From the beginning, the golden era of Ere Informatique or Loriciels, the French (little) companies have always sold more than 80% of their products in the world market. Almost all the titles, such as “Another World” or “Alone in the Dark” were in English, even in the French market. Many French guys have succeeded in the videogames industry, but as it’s a global industry, they were and still are involved in a non-national world. A national videogame industry is a nonsense, except maybe in Asia.

C&S:What remains for us to (re) invent in terms of gaming experience?
A.L.D:Maybe the next frontier could be the physical experience. The Wiimote and the Ki-nect were a first step, and now the “connected object” is blooming. It will probably take time, but I feel that the gamification of personal care is a strong trend.

Alain LE DIBERDER holds a Ph.D. in Economics. After advising French Minister of Culture Jack Lang (1989-1991), he moved to France Télévision under CEO Hervé Bourges (1991-1994) and then on to Canal + as Head of New Programmes (1994-2000), while he contributed to establishing several landmark cultural portals. He created Allociné TV, a channel devoted entirely to cinema, in 2010, and joined Arte as Head of Programmes on 1 January 2013. He has published several books and papers on digital technology and the media.

8Sep/140

VOD: a new distribution window just for Direct To Own as a growth relay

Gilles Fontaine
Gilles FONTAINE

Deputy Managing Director
Director of TV & Digital Content Business Unit

While DVD revenue continues its inexorable decline, transactional video – i.e. streaming and downloading to rent (DTR) or own (DTO) – is only barely picking up the slack. Online video rental cannot single-handedly offset the drop in DVD sales and rental.

So studios are focusing their energy on creating a new distribution window just for Direct To Own, also known as electronic sell through (EST), which falls before not only VoD rental (Direct To Rent) but also two to four weeks before any type of DVD release.

They are also imposing a window between online sales and online rentals. This new approach, which was introduced in late 2012, appears to be giving EST a boost. While VoD rentals are growing slowly (no doubt due in part to competition from SVoD), online sales are enjoying a solid uptick.

comparative-growth-different-video-segments-US-2013-500px

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Filed under: TV & Video No Comments
8Sep/140

TV viewers in the US watch fewer than 10% of the channels available to them

Antoine-Klifa-Idate-150px

Antoine Klifa
Consultant at IDATE

TV households in the United States still watch an average of 17 channels, despite steady increase in the number to choose from.

 

The high price of cable pay-TV packages in the United States is justified in part by the huge number of channels they include, even with basic packages. This pay-TV model operates under a system of bundles, i.e. subscriptions to popular channels are usually bundled with a host of less popular ones.

Under this model, it can be more expensive and harder for a customer to subscribe to a single premium channel rather than a whole package. This especially interesting when we know that TV households in the United States only watch an average 17 channels from among the host available to them.

Growth-number-channels-received-and-watched-TV-households-in-US500px

 

 

 

 

 

 

This stagnation in the number of channels that users actually tune in to underscores to some degree that specific content is more important than choice. Moreover, Internet technologies have bolstered the development of on-demand viewing. Now that users have more and more ways to access programmes, they also want to be able to access them on their own terms (à la carte) rather than be beholden to their multichannel video programming distributors’ (MVPD, aka pay-TV providers) commercially-motivated decisions.
To adapt to these new behaviours, MVPD are gradually starting to test new products that meet the needs of these “never cords” and “cord-shavers”. America’s leading cable company, Comcast, thus tested a temporary plan that included Internet access, access to its Xfinity Streampix streaming service and premium channel HBO. The plan was launched at around $50, which is well below the price that most users pay for a complete pay-TV package.

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2Sep/140

Future TV in 2025 : 3 scenarios for TV in the personal media era

Gilles Fontaine
Gilles FONTAINE

Deputy Managing Director
Director of TV & Digital Content Business Unit

At a time when Netflix is shaking up classic video distribution models, IDATE is delivering an analysis of ongoing disruptions in TV content distribution.

The television industry is having to contend with a major game changer, namely increasingly individualised viewing. This change is upending the industry’s longstanding mass media model, but also paving the way for new business models and a new period of growth.

Individual TV viewing also represents a dual opportunity: to transform the household market into individual markets, and to capitalise on the shift from mass advertising to more relevant targeted advertising.

This growing individualisation is part of the "cloudification" of the technical chain that makes it possible to better serve multi-network and multi-device behaviours, and of the process of adapting services to find the right interplay between linear and on-demand TV, to re-monetise catch-up TV, and to develop the SVoD and electronic sell-through (EST) markets.

IDATE has developed three scenarios to describe and quantify the potential impact of this tremendous change in video content markets:

a growth scenario: "the new golden age" where the increasing individualisation of video consumption and Internet access leads to the creation of a market for individual subscriptions, and where video – both linear and on-demand – becomes a medium of choice for advertisers;
a scenario of stagnation: “business as usual” wherein pay-TV plans remain largely monolithic, where on-demand products hold little appeal and TV’s ad revenue suffers from advertisers moving a portion of their spending over to the Web;
a negative scenario of "commoditisation," characterised by an accelerated migration from a paid to a free model, and TV losing its relevance as an advertising medium.

The three TV/video market development scenarios applied to the US (billion €)

The-three-TV-Video-market-development-scenarios-applied-to-the-US-500px

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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26Aug/140

Smart Toys: a new video game market segment

MICHAUD Laurent

Laurent Michaud
Head of Consumer Electronics & Digital Entertainment Practice

Future set to play nice with smart toys: 
a sector forecast to climb to 7.4 billion EUR in 2018.

Smart toys, or app toys, consist of three interconnected elements: a video game, one or more connected objects and a distribution platform with a display. Smart toys now constitute a new market segment, at the cross-section of the video game and toy industries.
Tablets are proving to be a good platform for smart toys to recreate or adapt innovative game concepts and transform existing toys. Smart toys use several technologies that allow the toy to talk to the application: NFC, gesture recognition by camera, static electricity, sound pulses and Bluetooth.

The possible interactions between the three components of video games are inspiring games creators to create new, innovative forms of entertainment, which can be exploited by both video game developers and toy manufacturers in search of new markets. This is why leading toy manufacturers such as Hasbro, Mattel, Lego and Bandai, are gradually embracing them.

Also getting in on the action are video game market players, big and small. Activision Blizzard is one of the pioneers in this area, with its Skylanders series of video games and collectible figurines that interact with a fun app of the same name. As of February 2014, the franchise has generated 2 billion USD and more than 175 million figurines have been sold.

The range of possible combinations between app, object and display device means an equally wide a range of business models, depending on the smart toy creator's core business:
• A toy manufacturer will tend to focus on the object and the business model typically attached to it. This sector is showing no more than 1% growth, so their goal is to capture a share of the video game market by developing smart toys that make better use of the software component. One trump card already in their hands are the licences to popular products;
• A video game publisher and developers will tend to focus on the application, which will be marketed as free-to-play. They have already proven themselves in this segment, but smart toys could well materialize in other kinds of video game, such as sport and action/adventure titles. So there is no shortage of opportunity. Added to which, these new offerings will disrupt the video game value chain, which is dominated by digital content distribution;
• lastly, a pure player from the smart toy sector will opt for a combination of these two approaches.

The outlook for smart toys in this new gaming market is particularly promising: the sector’s worth could climb to 7.4 billion EUR in 2018, compared to 2.2 billion EUR at the end of 2014.
Backed by toy manufacturers, game developers hold the keys to success here, provided they deliver truly innovative gameplay, regardless of the target platform: tablet, smartphone, personal computer or home console.

 Growth-of-global-smart-toy-market-500px

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Filed under: TV & Video No Comments
25Jun/140

300 series produced in the US for the 2013-2014 season

Gilles Fontaine
Gilles FONTAINE

Deputy Managing Director
Director of TV & Digital Content Business Unit

Original production in the US had long been the fiefdom of the top TV networks and a limited group of premium cable pay-TVs. Today, however, all cable channels are developing an original production policy, operating alongside their reruns of series produced by the big networks.

Some of the most popular series in the United States have been produced not by these heavyweights, or by HBO: Mad Men, Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead (AMC), The Americans (FX), Rectify and Top of The Lake (Sundance).

This new strategy has been especially profitable for AMC which originally aired only reruns: in 10 years, its earnings from cablecos has gone from $0.22 to $0.35 a month per subscriber.

 

Series produced by American networks for the 2013-2014 series

25Jun/140

Online piracy: a turnaround in Europe?

Alexandre JOLINAlexandre JOLIN

Consultant at IDATE

 

IDATE estimates that industry losses due to the various forms of illegal video consumption – namely P2P, downloads and streaming – totalled €6.3 billion in Europe in 2013, which translates into 37.8% increase from 2010 to 2013.

The main reason for this rise in online video piracy is the lack of attractive video on-demand (VoD) services in Europe, which is due in large part to:
• a very scattered offering, which is hard for users to navigate through;
• the fact that legacy pay-TV providers have captures the rights for the most premium content, and are taking a defensive approach to new distribution channels;
• very few online sales options;
• certain regulatory restrictions, such as the media chronology in France and Germany for feature films.

The VoD sector’s consolidation, and the inroads being made by American companies, especially in the subscription VoD segment, is expected to breathe some life into Europe’s video-on-demand market, and contribute indirectly to scaling back users’ reliance on piracy. IDATE estimates that industry losses due to piracy should decrease by 6.5% between 2014 and 2018.

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20Jun/140

FTTx services and pricing : positioning of offering

CHAILLOU_Valérie

Valérie CHAILLOU
Head of Research, Telecoms Business Unit, IDATE

From less than 40 EUR to more than 100 EUR per month for 100 Mbps access

IDATE’s latest report focuses on the services offered by telecom and cable operators via their FTTx infrastructures. It analyses the various speeds offered, the services included in the offering, pricing tiers and also highlights disparities between regions.

The speed race has not yet reached the finish line

Over the past few months, many operators have announced the launch of new offerings with even higher speeds, thanks to their FTTH/B networks. In the space of six months, no fewer than five operators in Europe have launched 1 Gbps offerings! Up until then, 100 Mbps was considered the norm for ultra-fast broadband (UFB), but now there are many offerings with 300, 400 or 500 Mbps speeds. These are not always very visible and are sometimes not even available as part of a bundle (this is the case with Verizon's 500 Mbps offering, which is only available as a stand-alone service). However, this strategy allows telecom operators using FTTH to differentiate themselves better from cable operators whose peak speeds are normally around 150 to 200 Mbps.

Segmentation of services: speeds and TV/video services prioritised

UFB players do not always go for strong segmentation based on available speeds. As a general rule, plans are built around 3 to 4 speeds, but for some, the offering is limited to 1 or 2 speeds, continuing on from the positioning they adopted in the traditional broadband market.
As for TV and video services, segmentation is sometimes stronger due to providing customers with themed packages (sports, movies, kids), especially for players from English-speaking countries. Generally speaking, telecom and cable operators from English-speaking countries have a very specific approach because they mainly promote video services and TV channels. Speed is only a secondary selling point. Their offerings are characterised by an increasing number of plans available with the ability to customise bundles (or, for more pragmatic players, to help select a pre-configured bundle).
In other regions, the approach seems more pragmatic, with fewer bundles and a more limited choice for end users.

With a lack of innovative services, prices are remaining stable

None of the players studied here offers a particularly innovative service. Most bundle add-ons, such as new set-top box features, cloud-based storage, antivirus, etc., are systematically added to the basic offering. Therefore, operators are unable to differentiate themselves from each other. A very small number of players, such as Altibox in Norway and HKBN in Hong Kong, are exploiting the technical characteristics of FTTH networks to offer genuinely differentiated services with symmetric upload/download speeds. In the short term, it seems very likely that speed (including symmetry, guarantees, faster speeds) will remain the main area to exploit for UFB operators.

This should impact prices offered, which have remained relatively stable in each of the major regions over the past year.

average-monthly-price-triple-plai-Fttx-100bps-500px

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want to discover our last study on this subject.

20Jun/140

Cloud TV : a “game changer” for TV distribution

Jacques Bajon

 

Jacques Bajon, Head of "Video Distribution" Practice

Cloud TV solutions being developed in a new video consumption environment that is having a profound effect on distribution modes.

In its latest report published in its monitoring service “Cloud & Infrastructure”, IDATE analyses Cloud TV solutions the advantages and the issues that still remains.

The cloud TV phenomenon is part of the massive changes taking place in our TV and video viewing habits and, by extension, in video distribution. This cloud-based approach to distributing TV programming refers to the fact of offering services from a central platform connected to the Web, and which can serve any user device.
A cloud platform can be operated by OTT (over the top) content providers who deliver their solution directly over the Web, or by telecom operators who use their own networks. In this second instance, the service is typically not assimilated with the cloud per se, even if we will include it in our field of analysis.

What cloud TV brings to the industry

• It is above all a response to a growing demand among consumers to have access to TV everywhere.
• It paves the way for more personalised video viewing and targeted advertising.
• The fact of centralising the solution enables more flexible rollouts and the abilty to offer a broader array of services.
• The growing move towards virtualisation allows vendors to achieve more cost-effective capital and operating expenses for their video distribution business.
• And brings vendors one step closer to deploying concept of TV as a service, so creating ties with users, or of operator as a service, for distributors looking to achieve more operational flexibility.

But certain unknowns remain

In addition to increasing quality of service (QoS) to meet users’ demands, the gradual switch to cloud-based video solutions will no doubt also generate a sizeable increase in traffic on the Internet and managed networks, and with it the inevitable challenges of maintaining a steady level of quality.
New challenges are arising as barriers to entry into video distribution are being lowered, through expansive platforms that are not subject to any network coverage, device compatility or geographical imperatives.
• We could thus see an acceleration in the rise of independent video offerings, which could include libraries of self-distributed content. This type of configuration could result in telecom operators being cut out of the loop and losing control of consumers.
• In addition, service providers and broadcasters will be going head to head with their TV Everywhere applications, offering potentially identical content but being delivered by pay-TV providers and TV networks, for instance.
• The traditional TV distribution industry runs the risk of being marginalised by these developments. But it has developoled its own solutions to meet some of viewers’ new demands and, above all, has begun to integrate these new options into its own environment.
• And, finally, cloud TV represents a major gateway for the Internet giants that are currently competing against pay-TV providers and programme aggregators for a foothold in this new market.

Cloud-TV-Summary-new-viewing-habits-new-features

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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