20Aug/150

Connected TV

BAJON_Jacques

Jacques Bajon
Head of Media & Digital Content Business Unit, IDATE DigiWorld

Who will come out on top?

 

 

The development of smart TV is inextricably bound up with the widespread availability of high-speed Internet access, a shift to more and more individual viewing and the proliferation of smart devices in the home. Together, these three elements are steadily revolutionising how viewers access their TV programmes, and providing them with an array of new functions and features.

Televisions can be connected to the Internet in several ways. Using:

a smart or connected TV (direct connection, via Ethernet or Wi-Fi)

a connected set-top box/DVR,

a connected set-top box/DVR

a streaming box or stick

or a connected game console. or a connected game console.

Today, close to half of the televisions being shipped are smart TVs, even if their owners may not systematically take advantage of the Internet connection. At the same time, the market for streaming devices – whose main purpose is to play online videos – is progressing rapidly.

Within this market that is still populated by a great many solutions and services, several trends are taking shape:

smart TV has shifted from "Internet-centric" to "video centric";

managing connectivity with users’ personal devices has become a key issue, with app systems playing an increasingly central role;

OTT services are moving to the TV and making real strides;

viral platforms, which are “systematically” included on smart devices, are steadily consolidating their position in the video distribution chain.

Technological progress is also helping to vitalise the market, whether by increasing users’ connection speeds, through progress in compression thanks to the use of HEVC, or functionalities that improve the user experience, such as casting – i.e. the ability to send content from a personal device to the TV set.

The main stakeholders in the connected TV ecosystem can be broken down into three categories, based on their original sector of activity: consumer electronics (CE) companies, TV market players and the Internet’s leaders.

CE industry players are working to improve their software interfaces, either through dedicated developments such as Samsung has done with Tizen, or by acquiring another company, as LG has done with WebOS. The aim is to capture the added-value in the marketplace, whether in the arena of services and/or by selling high-end devices.

Players from the TV universe are developing their OTT products, and working to bolster their position on the software side of the equation with more open and hybrid platforms. The smart TV could enable them to renew ties with consumers, and better monetise their plans. Veteran TV market players nevertheless remains threatened by the shift to more individual viewing, the risk of being cut out of the equation and a dramatic loss of revenue. Smart TVs can actually accelerate the growth of on-demand services, which naturally threatens the business of TV channels, and especially specialty channels, as well as the business of those who assemble pay-TV packages.

Lastly, companies such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft that dominate the Internet, are very knowledgeable about software, and changing consumer habits. So they are in the best position to deliver a top-notch user experience, whether in terms of smooth and intuitive interfaces, or providing recommendations based on user data. Their increasingly vertical positioning – covering everything from the content to the device – is also bolstering their potential to capture a growing portion of the video entertainment market.

Impact of the three scenarios on the smart TV market in 2025: size of the OTT market and smart devices used (billion EUR, %)

Connected_TV_schema

Source : IDATE, Connected TV, June 2015

The purpose of the three scenarios for “smart TV in 2025" is to determine which industries are likely to increase their control over the smart TV environment:

TV market players: "Smart TV ";

CE market players: "Consumer Electronics+";

or Internet specialists: "Internet video".

The size of the OTT video market will vary considerably under the three scenarios, depending on how the environment evolves and so which industries prevail. We estimate that the market could climb to:

41 billion EUR under the most conservative scenario, “Smart TV”;

57 billion EUR if consumer electronic gain the upper hand, with earnings based on revenue sharing;

105 billion EUR if Internet companies prove the most successful, with an ecosystem tailor made for OTT video services.

The popularity of the different devices will also evolve along the same lines:

the television will be used less to access services as the more disruptive scenarios come into being;

eventually, the PC will be marginalised, replaced to a large extent by personal devices.

 Regardless of the scenario, smartphones and tablets will be used more and more to watch videos, especially as viewing becomes an increasingly individual pastime.

Find out more on Connected TV in our dedicated market report

4Aug/150

Cloud TV: Video embraces IT

BAJON_Jacques

Jacques Bajon
Head of Media & Digital Content Business unit

 

 

 

The development of cloud TV solutions is part of the massive wave of change in today’s video market, and fuelled by users taking increasing control over their video viewing (on-demand, personal, multi-device, etc.). These changes require all service providers to adapt to the new paradigm and tailor their products to new viewer behaviours, and this inside an increasingly fragmented and competitive marketplace. The transition will also require them to find new ways to monetise content. The inherent uncertainties and complexity of this new state of affairs derive from the need to flexible, both from an operational standpoint and in the ability to roll out new services.

 The cloud TV market can be broken down into three components. Cloud TV is said to be private when the service is being supplied over the vendor company’s own infrastructure, and public when the infrastructure is located in a data centre outside the company’s premises, while hybrid solutions employ a combination of the two. These elements are combined with the various levels of service integration, ranging from infrastructure (IaaS) to PaaS (platform) and SaaS (software).

 The business model for cloud TV solutions is very similar to the one used by classic cloud computing products, i.e. payment based on consumption, or a monthly or annual subscription. It is the vendor of the cloud solution that invoices the TV provider. From a more general standpoint, adopting cloud solutions allows companies to convert their Capex into Opex by switching from a system of purchasing and amortising infrastructure to one of infrastructure rental.

 A number of players are involved in providing cloud TV solutions: the Internet giants and software specialists, telecom equipment suppliers and TV solution specialists who have beefed up the cloud dimension of their services. The television and home equipment sector has also expanded its product line to adapt to this new paradigm.

 Taking a broader perspective, the changes being forced on solution providers require them to acquire new skillsets, especially in the arena of software, but also in digital marketing, analytics, security, etc. These new skills can be acquired either through partnerships to create an ecosystem of solutions, or by taking over a specialised company.

 Cloud TV solutions are tailored to the customer’s needs, and typically rely on an ecosystem of partnerships, which can in fact cover the entire video content technical chain, from production to viewing, by way of post-production.

 Cloud TV products can occupy one or several niches, all aimed at satisfying customers’ new requirements. The market has been heavily influenced by video on-demand systems (incorporating nPVR), multi-device and unified interfaces, and systems for managing traffic surges on the network, notably thanks to hybrid cloud solutions.

 But there are still a number of lingering questions and obstacles in the cloud TV market. The infrastructures’ ability to manage a growing number of unicast streams raises concerns over quality of service further down the road. Regulatory uncertainties, notably over the use of private data and content copyright, continue to impede monetisation and product development. We expect that finding the optimal way to monetise video products will be the next big challenge the market will tackle. Because it lowers barriers to entry, the development of cloud TV will also increase competition in the video distribution market.

 It is also true that these solutions have helped make it easier to launch new video services – and especially more personalised and multi-device ones – by reducing the financial risks involved. This positive trend is on the supply side, where a great many vendors are positioned – including those from a TV industry is in the throes of a profound transition. But fully outsourcing content management does not seem to line up with market realities. What we are seeing instead is the development of hybrid cloud formats.

 How cloud TV products are positionedClients’ needs

Cloud TV products

 

 

Development of time-shifted viewing

·       nPVR: video recording in the cloud

·       catch-up TV services

·       (S)VOD

·       Time shifted TV

·       Management of consumption growth(server and unicast traffic peaks)

Multiple screens to address

·       Multiscreen delivery platform

·       Unified interface adapted to all screens, centrally managed

·       Encoding & adaptation of the video format to the consumption screen thanks to adaptive streaming

TV Everywhere

Indoor – Multiroom/outdoor

·       Multiscreen, network agnostic delivery platforms

·       Encoding, adaptation of the video bitrate according to available bandwidth and network used

Mid- to long-tail content – Personalized viewing – Live viewing

·       "Unlimited" storage

·       Consumption monitoring and recommendations for TV/VOD/Catch-up services

·       Live OTT for events and simulcasts

·       Virtualized playout centre (not ready for prime time)

Content rights management

·       DRM

·       Digital Rights Lockers (DRL)

Collaborative work

·       Centralised production, postproduction

Monetisation: Creation or improvement of advertising and pay-TV based business models

·       Dynamic ad insertion

·       Targeted ads inserted in the video stream or in the interface

·       Authentication

·       Centralised billing

Source: IDATE, "Cloud TV", March 2015

 Find out more about Cloud TV in our dedicated market report

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7Jul/150

Audiovisual Industry Going Global: what options for European service publishers

JOLIN-Alexandre

Alexandre Jolin
TV expert at IDATE

The audiovisual market has always been a traditionally multinational industry. Within the industry, content production, publishing and distribution activities have highly varying levels of internationalisation. There has been a marked escalation of transnational mergers over the recent period, indicating a new phase in globalisation of the industry.

There is now pressure coming from two main angles: producers are faced with constantly increasing production costs, and distributors are faced with continually high CAPEX levels and new competition from OTT players. European service publishers have to reinvent their strategies in this new globalised context, which is dominated by North American players.

European video service publishers are under pressure

The audiovisual market has always been a traditionally multinational industry. Within the industry, content production, publishing and distribution activities have highly varying levels of internationalisation. However, there has been a marked escalation of transnational mergers over the recent period, indicating a new phase in globalisation of the industry.

There is now pressure coming from two main angles: producers are faced with constantly increasing production costs, and distributors are faced with continually high CAPEX levels and new competition from OTT players. European service publishers have to reinvent their strategies in this new globalised context, which is dominated by North American players.

Threats and opportunities from globalisation for the main player categories in the value chain
Globalisation
Source: IDATE, Audiovisual industry going global, April 2015

Americanisation of the European audiovisual sector

 

Several markers point to a trend of increased Americanisation of the European audiovisual industry:

Increased number of US acquisitions of European players:

- in the content production segment, including the acquisition of Endemol by the private equity firm Apollo Global Management in 2012 and the takeover of All3Media by Liberty Global and Discovery Communications
- in the TV channel broadcaster segment, including Liberty Global's purchase of a 6.4% stake in ITV and the acquisition of Channel 5 by the Viacom Group in 2014
- in the distribution segment, including Liberty Global's acquisition of Virgin Media and Ziggo, and the takeovers of Ono and Kabel Deutschland by Vodafone

The emergence of oligopolistic situations in new market segments:

- iTunes dominates the global transactional VOD market
- Amazon Prime Instant Video and Netflix in particular dominate the global and European SVOD markets

Consumption focused around North American programming

Focused strategies vs. market conquering strategies

Faced with globalisation of the audiovisual industry led mainly by North American players, European players are adopting two types of generic strategy:

strategies focusing on their core business and domestic market, characterised by:

- moderate investment in native language productions
- acquisition of North American and international fictional programming to ensure high viewing numbers during prime time
- OTT strategies based on reusing content rights already acquired as part of own brand or joint-venture services

strategies aimed at conquering markets via business diversification and international development, including:

- increased investment in original content productions that can be exploited abroad, particularly via international co-productions
- acquisition of exclusive first-run premium content
- OTT strategies based around new services that exploit broader rights catalogues than what is available via broadcast networks

Find out more about the reasons behind globalization, its models and impacts for the audiovisual industry in our dedicated market report

 

6Jul/150

Future TV 2025: Internet TV & entertainment operators: disruptions ahead

BAJON_Jacques

Jacques Bajon
Head of Media & Digital Content Business Unit, IDATE

Linear TV is still the main source of revenues for the video industry – however, traditional players in mature markets see their business shrinking and have to adapt to an increasingly dense ecosystem, notably regarding competition from internet players. One of our estimates is that linear TV revenues will drop from EUR 368bn in 2015 to 344bn in 2025, against skyrocketing On-Demand TV revenues jumping from EUR 25bn to EUR126bn in 2025. In our disruptive scenario we assume the complete disappearing of home video up from 2022. Nonetheless, the total videomarket will grow with an annual average rate of 1.4% worldwide.

Disruptive scenario: Global TV market, 2015-2025 (billion EUR)
Future TV 2025
Source: IDATE, Future TV 2025, May 2015

In developed countries, the TV sector has been suffering from what is expected to be a lasting state of stagnation, brought on by a growing number of channels; the relative saturation of pay-TV markets, and increasing competition from the Internet for viewers and advertising money.

Keeping in line with current market trends, a snapshot of the market 10 years from now includes on-demand services having a relatively small impact on revenue (accounting for around 10% of the total market in 2025) and a global market that will continue to grow by around 3.5% a year, on average – a large percentage of which will come from emerging countries. Asia/Pacific will become the world’s biggest market, while growth in the main European markets will be weak, and possibly even negative.

But another, far more disruptive picture is also possible. One where on-demand becomes the viewing method of choice amongst consumers, and live viewing confined largely to special events. Under this alternative scenario, on-demand services account for close to 30% of the sector’s revenue in 2025.

Two phenomena are at work here:

on-demand services replace linear TV but generate less revenue per customer for an equal number of subscribers;
on-demand services undermine the revenue earned by linear services by lowering both ad rates and subscription prices.

As a result, the market grows much more slowly than under the “business as usual” scenario, and even enters into a lasting state of recession in developed countries.

In this declining market, veteran market players – i.e. channels and distributors – lose a share of their income to the leading entertainment operators. Only content producers, which earn a growing share of the revenue being generated, are not affected by market deflation.

Veteran players are thus having to contend with two big issues:

shrinking TV retail markets;
decreasing share of the margin earned on these markets.

Find out more details regarding disruptions in TV content distribution and user behavior in our dedicated market report

Filed under: TV & Video No Comments
29Jun/150

Digital First: ICT players vs. the new disrupters

DWS2015

The place to be in Europe, to understand upcoming disruptions and their impact on telecom, IT, Internet and media markets

From 17 to 19 November 2015, the 37th annual DigiWorld Summit will bring together 150 top-tier speakers to Montpellier to share their views with the more than 1,200 participants from over 30 countries. French Tech will also be in the spotlight during the 2nd annual DigiWorld Week and at the inaugural DigiWorld Awards.

Under the banner of “Digital First” IDATE will host debates on the core trends shaping telecom, IT, Internet and media markets, with the knowledge that digital technology is entering a new stage in its ubiquity, becoming the vehicle of a major overhaul in many sectors: energy, insurance, finance, health, automotive, travel and tourism… “But,” says IDATE CEO, Yves Gassot, “this digital verticalisation also represents a new challenge for IT, telecoms, Internet and media industry stakeholders. They may see new growth opportunities, but also challenges as innovation cycles are accelerating, as they consider the shifting outlines of their business and contend with new digital intermediaries.”

This new stage in the digital transformation is being spurred by ubiquitous wireline and wireless connectivity, the economies of scale of cloud computing, and the power of real time data processing algorithms. But it is being amplified by the rise of connected objects, and the promises of 3D printing, of artificial intelligence and the collaborative economy. A profound transformation of the economy that is already materialising in changes to production and distribution infrastructures, in the accelerated shift from product to service and the profusion of channels for interaction with end users.

• What do vertical companies (media groups and TV networks, insurance, automotive, travel, retail, etc.) want from digital industry players (telcos, OTT, IT)?

• How should digital industry players position themselves with respect to the digital transformation in vertical markets?

• How can the Web’s top destination platforms cohabitate with the vertical markets’ new digital champions?

• This year’s Guest Country: China. Can China combine the power of its recently acquired positions in Internet and telecom markets with its manufacturing ambitions?

2015 DigiWorld Summit Programme

 

Plenary sessions

Analysis and debates between veteran industry players and disruptive start-ups, with insights from IDATE’s finest economists and analysts:

Digital channels
A new chapter in the platform wars?

Digital Infrastructure
From ultra smart networks to predictive analytics?

Digital Product
From goods to services

Digital Regulation
OTT rules?

Digital Europe, Digital World
Closing session

Specialty forums

In-depth seminars with the industry’s top expertsConnected Things Forum

Smart City Forum

Future Networks

TV & Video Distribution Forum

Future Digital Economy Forum

Game Summit

DigiWorld Week (14 – 22 November 2015): IDATE expands on the two days of the DigiWorld Summit, and plays host to an exciting event-filled week. Delving deeper into the issues and shaking up ideas: symposiums, workshops, hackathons, exhibitions, festivals, master classes, …

DigiWorld Awards: in partnership with Business France and French Tech, IDATE will be hosting the first annual DigiWorld Awards, recognising French digital start-ups (Equipment and devices, Networks and telecoms, Internet services and application, M2M and IoT…), created abroad. Awards will be in four categories: Africa and the Middle East – The Americas – Asia – Europe

The DigiWorld Summit, is organised under the patronage of the French Ministry of the Economy, Industry and Digital Affairs, the Région Languedoc Roussillon and Montpellier Métropole, with the support of DigiWorld Institute member companies.

More informations about IDATE's expertise and events :

www.idate.org      www.digiworldsummit.com      www.digiworldweek.com

21May/150

Content is king. Still.

Yves Gassot

Yves Gassot
CEO, IDATE

 

Over the past few decades, TV service providers’ market power guaranteed them a certain leadership in production.

Vertical integration

Thanks to a steady relaxation of competition rules in the United States, the resulting vertical integration trend has seen production studios merge with TV networks and cable companies. In other markets, such as France, public authorities have continued to oppose such a trend, underscoring how vital production independent of the top networks is to sustaining diversity and creativity.

A new way of consumption

Here too the Internet is changing the status quo. We watch more and more videos. We watch them more on our own, and from increasingly global sources. Content providers and pay-TV distributors are being penalised both by their costs and their only national footprint, and are having to contend with two major threats: being cut out of the service equation and being cut off from customers. Market heavyweights like the ones found in the United States are having to weigh the pros and cons of working with a platform such as Netflix that is expanding worldwide, versus setting up their own over-the-top solution… and protecting what is still their main source of income, i.e. selling programmes to TV channels (including affiliate stations). But their dilemma is still less dire than the one facing Europe’s independent providers, who have a primarily national footprint and which are often restricted in the extent to which they can exploit the rights to the programmes they help finance.

Ecosystem and legislation

The European Commission likes the idea of having TV rights negotiated for the EU as a whole. It would provide an opportunity to introduce the idea of economies of scale in a lucrative sector, and one that has a tremendous cultural influence. Unfortunately, in its revised version, this plan, which is one of the pillars of the Digital Single Market proposal unveiled in early May, is coming up against Europe’s very disparate set of national TV ecosystems. As national laws – and especially the state of the industry – currently stand, very few companies in the EU can hope to come out winners in any negotiations for rights to all 28 European markets. Bluntly put, a very cut and dried application of such a scheme would more likely be a boon for outsiders such as Netflix, Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, etc.
Despite which, our desire to be optimistic leads us to hope that the steady and inexorable development of the OTT video model will drive a change in legislation across Europe, and lead to cross-border and possibly continental deals between Europe’s TV sector players.

For the publication of the last study about "OTT Regulation" and  the 15th edition of the DigiWorld Yearbook, IDATE is organizing a conference on the perspectives and key trends that will structure the digital economy for the next decade, DigiWorld Future

Register for the Conference in Paris the 16th of June     Discover the programme

More informations about IDATE's expertise and events :

www.idate.org      www.digiworldsummit.com      www.digiworldweek.com       www.gamesummit.pro

20Mar/150

Nouveau cycle de conférences de prospective numérique sur les enjeux de l’Internet, de la télévision et des télécoms à 2025

logo DWFuture generique 2015

A l’occasion de la sortie de la nouvelle édition de son DigiWorld Yearbook, l’IDATE présente son nouveau cycle de conférences de prospective numérique sur les enjeux de l’Internet, de la télévision et des télécoms à 2025 !

La première session DigiWorld Future  se déroulera le 16 juin au Palais Brongniart, à Paris,  dans le cadre du Festival Futur en Seine en partenariat avec la Ville de Paris et Cap Digital.

A partir des analyses des experts de l’IDATE, les débats seront animés par Marjorie Paillon, Journaliste, Tech 24, Philippe Escande, Rédacteur en Chef, Le Monde et Gilles Babinet, avec les contributions exceptionnelles de :

sebastienbazin lowaxellelemaire lowMaurice Levy lowfrederic mazzella lowrichardstephaneOROUSSAT low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4Feb/150

Netflix: the N in GAFA-N?

JD Seval-PortraitsIDATE--83pxJean-Dominique Seval
Deputy CEOs of IDATE
FONTAINE_Gilles83pxGilles FONTAINE
Deputy CEOs of IDATE

A point of view published in Les Echos 12th of february 2015

There is quite a crowd of candidates jostling to become our entertainment operators, our personalised content access platform. Heading the ranks is the famous GAFA foursome, i.e. Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon. Each of these four giants has managed to grow its business by leveraging their initial disruptive innovation, which quickly expanded into other arenas: a search engine that became the world’s biggest ad broker, a genius hardware manufacturer that invented the app store, a social networking site now poised to become a viral content distribution platform, and an online bookshop that has become a global one-stop-shop for every product imaginable. A power that is measured in superlative figures: billions of users, record-breaking revenue, the biggest cash flows and the highest market caps… Not to mention the advantages of being a ubiquitous global brand: the ability to create local versions of online products quickly across the planet, and an apparently unquenchable thirst for diversification that today includes robots, online banking, virtual reality, cloud computing services and, so, content.

The virtuous circle of Netflix

Can Netflix carve itself a place alongside these giants? Its success lies is keeping the promise of unlimited video, with a strong emphasis on TV series. A simple and efficient product that seduced American viewers with its ultra competitive price, compared to what cable companies charge. And it now appears poised to be embraced by Europeans as well, even the younger ones who are used to getting their videos for free via streaming, but seem to be willing to pay €8 a month to access the service.
But the power of the model also lies in a service that is built around the Web’s most popular content: video, which already accounts for close to 60% of open Internet traffic in France. Added to this is Netflix’s ability to invest massively in the most sought-after creative content today: TV series. Avoiding the distribution costs of a commercial intermediary, which account for close to 50% of HBO’s business model, Netflix can finance the production of original TV series. Starting out as just one content distributor among many, the firm from Los Gatos, in the heart of Silicon Valley, soon became a true master of the genre. A genre that may well become the emblem of the early part of this century, in the same way that theatre, the novel or cinema were for previous centuries – with the potential to lay claim to the moniker of major art form, attracting the finest writers, the best actors and huge production budgets. Much as stories serialised in the written press were once amalgamated into popular novels, television series are now being binge watched, and no longer viewed by a single episode a week. In the hands of the teams at Netflix, the series is becoming a precious weapon, at once capable of securing customer loyalty with popular series like House of Cards, of opening up new markets as with the brand new series, Marco Polo, which is aimed squarely at the Asian market, and negotiating their local bona fides, as they have in France with their commitment to produce a series like Marseille locally.

An all-in-one subscription for content?

Netflix being propelled to the rank of Internet giant also rests on the supposition that the success of the all inclusive subscription to TV programmes can be expanded to include other content, in the near future. We already have unlimited subscriptions to music (Spotify and Deezer), print media (Relay.Com), video games (OnLive) and books (Oyster and Amazon, of course). But we should also note that the lines are shifting, as Pascal Nègre, President and CEO of Universal Music France, recently touted these services as the ultimate means of saving the revenue of one of the first industries in the firing line of the digital revolution. Meanwhile publishers are still debating the wisdom of applying the model to books, with most coming out against it.
As veteran specialists struggle to introduce viable subscription plans, an outside player, armed with a cross-media universal subscription model could emerge. Netflix could be the promoter in chief, buoyed up by the success of its video-centric model. It could carry that model over to other content, and overtake not just traditional players, but even Amazon, Apple and Google which, although already well entrenched in this market, have thus far failed to demonstrate any great skill. This would mark a true disruption. By dominating the universal content subscription, in the same way that Amazon has become an all-in-one store, Netflix would become our main provider of paid access to all content. A veritable earthquake that would completely shake up the way culture industries’ value chains are organised. It would also undoubtedly pave the way for a whole series of changes: cross-cutting recommendations covering all manner of content, accessing an article in the press the way we currently access songs, paying authors according to the size of their readership…

Netflix stepping into this closed circle of giants would confirm one of the Internet’s key maxims: winner takes all. In a globalised market, a single player dominates each segment. But the GAFA foursome have not yet lost the content battle, nor are they ready to lay down their arms.

Jean-Dominique Séval and Gilles Fontaine, Deputy CEOs of IDATE

20Jan/150

Video getting personal: The Network PVR (nPVR) technology: a new generation of digital recorders

Jacques Bajon

Jacques Bajon
Head of "Video Distribution" Practice

IDATE has released its White Paper on personalised video consumption, explored through the development of network based programme recording made possible by network PVR (nPVR) technology.

For Jacques Bajon, Head of IDATE’s Video Distribution Practice and author of this report, “consumers are taking control and shifting gradually from passive viewers to active participants in their consumption of TV services. Recording programmes is a major example of this shift. Network based recording and storage functions thanks to nPVR systems is a solution that makes it possible to strengthen the synergies between linear and on-demand TV services, paving the way for a win-win model for consumers, rights holders and network operators”.

The cloudification of TV

The network PVR (nPVR) is an evolution of PVR which moves the storage of programme recordings to operators’ servers.. It is thus part of a wider process of deployment of platforms in the area of video distribution into “the cloud”, i.e. the moving of distribution features from the home television to remote servers. This “cloud” approach to managing video content is being progressively adopted due to the flexibility given to the editors of TV services, network operators and consumers.

Distributors around the world that have implemented this solution are many, especially in Europe, seeking to capitalise on the positive externalities for all of the parties involved:

• The user benefits from an improvement of the recording feature, now available on all viewing devices. In addition, a new population is becoming eligible for the facilities of digital recording, without bearing the cost of expensive equipment.
• Rights holders rely on networking solutions to better monitor the use of their content outside linear programming, create a new link with television viewers/users and thus better monetise that content. Influential in terms of programmes, TV channels can then promote the relationship between linear and non-linear offers and find new revenue leverage based on cumulative audiences. This evolution applies more and more in a secure environment that does not necessarily question the rights holders’ remuneration systems.
• The network operator sees in the deployment of nPVR the possibility of an optimisation of the costs of digital recording solutions in comparison with hard drives deployed in homes. These gains could allow operators to invest in the ergonomics and functionalities of the services, which are now the heart of the added value of video content distribution.

With the consumer gaining flexibility in video use, rights holders transforming the threat of delinearisation into an opportunity for better exploitation of their content and operators able to better manage those services operationally, there is the possibility of creating a virtuous circle, made possible through nPVR solutions.

Map of nPVR deployments in Europe

map-of-NPVR-deployment-europe-2015

 

 

 

 
Source: IDATE

> To download the White Paper, this way.

 

5Jan/150

Le Digiworld Summit 2014 in drawings

ouverture DWS14

The 2014 digiworld summit "drawn from life" by Aurélie Bordenave, alias Léely. Discover all the strong moments. (texts are in french or in english)

 

 

 

 

Global introduction

Welcom-adress-and-global-solution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plenary: Business models, Rethinking the telcos business models in the 5G era

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Keynote : Smart Glasses

 

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Business models: Rethinking the telcos business models in the 5G era

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Disruptive innovations: one step towards 5G

michel-combes-alcatel

 

Smart City & Mobile living

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Seminar "TV everywhere"

tv-everywhere
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Seminar : "Business models: M2M & Internet of Things - Smarter objects, smarter processes"

m2m-internet-of-things

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Business models: Narrowing the gap between explosive usage and limited ad revenues
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Europe on the rebound ?

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TV & facing Mobility

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>> Retrouvez tous les dessins d'Aurélie Bordenave durant le Digiworld Summit 2014 sur Flickr.

>> Découvrez le travail d'Aurélie Bordenave alias Léely sur son site.